College (un)bound The future of higher education and what it means for students

Jeffrey J. Selingo

Book - 2013

Jeff Selingo, journalist and editor-in-chief of the Chronicle for Higher Education, argues that colleges can no longer sell a four-year degree as the ticket to success in life. College (Un)Bound exposes the dire pitfalls in the current state of higher education for anyone concerned with intellectual and financial future of America.

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Subjects
Published
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt [2013]
Language
English
Physical Description
xviii, 238 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9780544027077
0544027078
Main Author
Jeffrey J. Selingo (-)
  • The great credential race
  • The customer is always right
  • The trillion-dollar problem
  • The five disruptive forces that will change higher education forever
  • A personalized education
  • The online revolution
  • The student swirl
  • Degrees of value
  • The skills of the future
  • Why college?
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Part cultural critique, part trend-spotting, and part advice for students and parents navigating a flawed system, this analysis paints an unflattering picture of middle-tier American colleges, while optimistically highlighting forward-thinking educational models. Selingo, editor-at-large of the Chronicle of Higher Education, describes a climate in which colleges compete for rankings by improving amenities, falling into an escalating cycle of tuition increases and larger financial aid packages that leave students with crushing debt, and a sense of students as consumers that leads to grade inflation and teaching compromises. As more jobs require a college degree, the average student views college as a credentialing process rather than a life experience. For today's "digital natives," Selingo suggests more flexible and less-expensive tools: Massive Open Online Classes (MOOCs) taught by major universities but accessible anywhere; hybrid classes that combine online lectures with in-person small group discussions; and self-directed online classes. For students deliberately choosing a traditional four-year residential college, Selingo recommends that they study topics that most engage their interests, seek passionate mentors, and learn through doing, or even failing. He delivers a powerful message to colleges themselves: the system is broken, and both their success as institutions and the future success of our workforce depends on their willingness to incorporate unbundled, lower-cost systems that allow students to customize their education. Agent: John F. Thornton, the Spieler Agency. (May) [Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Discusses the problems facing four-year colleges in the wake of the 2008 recession that left graduates with enormous debts and slim job prospects in a tough economy and describes institutions that are innovating to better prepare students in the future.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Discusses the problems facing four-year colleges in the wake of the 2008 recession that left graduates with enormous debts and slim job prospects in a tough economy and describes institutions that are innovating to better prepare students in the future.30,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Jeff Selingo, journalist and editor-in-chief of the Chronicle for Higher Education, argues that colleges can no longer sell a four-year degree as the ticket to success in life. College (Un)Bound exposes the dire pitfalls in the current state of higher education for anyone concerned with intellectual and financial future of America.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

What is the value of a college degree? The four-year college experience is as American as apple pie. So is the belief that higher education offers a ticket to a better life. But with student-loan debt surpassing the $1 trillion mark and unemployment of college graduates at historic highs, people are beginning to question that value. In College (Un)bound, Jeffrey J. Selingo argues that America’s higher education system is broken. The great credential race has turned universities into big business and fostered an environment where middle-tier colleges can command elite university-level tuition while concealing staggeringly low graduation rates, churning out graduates with few of the skills needed for a rapidly evolving job market. Selingo not only turns a critical eye on the current state of higher education but also predicts how technology will transform it for the better. Free massive online open courses (MOOCs) and hybrid classes, adaptive learning software, and the unbundling of traditional degree credits will increase access to high-quality education regardless of budget or location and tailor lesson plans to individual needs. Incisive, urgent, and controversial, College (Un)bound is a must-read for prospective students, parents, and anyone concerned with the future of American higher education.
 

Review by Publisher Summary 5

What is the value of a college degree? The four-year college experience is as American as apple pie. So is the belief that higher education offers a ticket to a better life. But with student-loan debt surpassing the $1 trillion mark and unemployment of college graduates at historic highs, people are beginning to question that value. In College (Un)bound, Jeffrey J. Selingo argues that America's higher education system is broken. The great credential race has turned universities into big business and fostered an environment where middle-tier colleges can command elite university-level tuition while concealing staggeringly low graduation rates, churning out graduates with few of the skills needed for a rapidly evolving job market. Selingo not only turns a critical eye on the current state of higher education but also predicts how technology will transform it for the better. Free massive online open courses (MOOCs) and hybrid classes, adaptive learning software, and the unbundling of traditional degree credits will increase access to high-quality education regardless of budget or location and tailor lesson plans to individual needs. Incisive, urgent, and controversial, College (Un)bound is a must-read for prospective students, parents, and anyone concerned with the future of American higher education.