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398.20943/Grimm
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Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 398.20943/Grimm Due Jun 12, 2022
Subjects
Published
New York : W.W. Norton & Co c2012.
Edition
The Bicentennial ed
Language
English
German
Physical Description
liii, 496 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (p. 483-496).
ISBN
9780393088861
0393088863
Other Authors
Jacob Grimm, 1785-1863 (-), Wilhelm Grimm, 1786-1859, Maria Tatar, 1945-
  • The tales. The frog king, or Iron Heinrich
  • A fairy tale about a boy who left home to learn about fear
  • The wolf and the seven little goats
  • The twelve brothers
  • Little brother and little sister
  • Rapunzel
  • The three little men in the woods
  • Hansel and Gretel
  • The fisherman and his wife
  • The brave little tailor
  • Cinderella
  • Mother Holle
  • The seven ravens
  • Little red riding hood
  • The Bremen town musicians
  • The devil and his three golden hairs
  • The magic table, the gold donkey, and the club in the sack
  • The elves
  • The robber bridegroom
  • Godfather death
  • Fitcher's bird
  • The juniper tree
  • The six swans
  • Briar Rose
  • Snow White
  • Rumpelstiltskin
  • The golden bird
  • The three feathers
  • The golden goose
  • Furrypelts
  • The singing, soaring lark
  • The goose girl
  • The poor miller's boy and the cat
  • The worn-out dancing shoes
  • The star talers
  • Snow White and Rose Red
  • The golden key.
  • Tales for adults. The Jew in the brambles
  • Mother Trudy
  • The hand with the knife
  • How children played butcher with each other
  • Hans Dumm
  • The evil mother-in-law
  • The children living in a time of famine
  • The stubborn child
  • The rose.
Review by Library Journal Reviews

Scholar Tatar does for the Brothers Grimm what she did for other tale spinners in The Annotated Fairy Tales. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Tatar (languages & literature, Harvard) presents her translations of 40 folktales collected by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, taking care to balance male and female protagonists. modern favorites like "Cinderella" and "Rapunzel" stand side by side with more obscure stories, such as "How the Children Played Butcher with Each Other" (which is as gruesome as the title implies). The multiple versions/variations given for each story include those that date back long before the Grimm Brothers time. While Jack Zipes's The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm includes many more stories, Tatar's clear and informative commentary on the many theories regarding the origins, meaning, and detail of the selected stories makes this an important addition to the canon. Adding extra interest and depth are 150 illustrations (many in color) by L. Leslie Brooke, Arthur Rackham, Wanda G g, and others. An outstanding addition to folklore, children's literature, and Germanic studies collections; also recommended for any collection of traditional folk and fairy tales. Mary Morgan Smith, Northland P.L., Pittsburgh Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The 200th anniversary of the publication of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's Children's Stories and Household Tales is the occasion for Tatar, a Harvard professor and leading fairytale scholar, to expand her annotated translation of selected tales (initially published in 2004). Adding only six new stories to the previous edition, readers won't find much new reading material here, but illustrations and expanded annotations enrich the text. Divided into "The Tales" (for children) and "Tales for Adults," there's fodder for burgeoning bookworms, nostalgic grown-ups, and serious academics. Beloved classics like "Rumpelstiltskin," "Hansel and Gretel," and "Rapunzel" occupy the first section, whereas lesser-known tales like the grisly "How Children Played Butcher with Each Other" and the anti-Semitic "The Jew in the Brambles" are appropriately sequestered in the second. But despite the separation, Tatar is consistent in her scholarly examination of each story—in illuminating introductions and annotations, she is equally comfortable calling up the German philosopher Walter Benjamin, imagining how audiences might respond to particular passages, and providing cross-references to other stories. This rich and valuable edition brilliantly showcases the brothers' storytelling acumen, and reinforces their tales as timeless for both children and for scholars. Illus. (Oct.) [Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The 200th anniversary of the publication of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's Children's Stories and Household Tales is the occasion for Tatar, a Harvard professor and leading fairytale scholar, to expand her annotated translation of selected tales (initially published in 2004). Adding only six new stories to the previous edition, readers won't find much new reading material here, but illustrations and expanded annotations enrich the text. Divided into "The Tales" (for children) and "Tales for Adults," there's fodder for burgeoning bookworms, nostalgic grown-ups, and serious academics. Beloved classics like "Rumpelstiltskin," "Hansel and Gretel," and "Rapunzel" occupy the first section, whereas lesser-known tales like the grisly "How Children Played Butcher with Each Other" and the anti-Semitic "The Jew in the Brambles" are appropriately sequestered in the second. But despite the separation, Tatar is consistent in her scholarly examination of each storyâ??in illuminating introductions and annotations, she is equally comfortable calling up the German philosopher Walter Benjamin, imagining how audiences might respond to particular passages, and providing cross-references to other stories. This rich and valuable edition brilliantly showcases the brothers' storytelling acumen, and reinforces their tales as timeless for both children and for scholars. Illus. (Oct.) [Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

Review by PW Annex Reviews

The 200th anniversary of the publication of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's Children's Stories and Household Tales is the occasion for Tatar, a Harvard professor and leading fairytale scholar, to expand her annotated translation of selected tales (initially published in 2004). Adding only six new stories to the previous edition, readers won't find much new reading material here, but illustrations and expanded annotations enrich the text. Divided into "The Tales" (for children) and "Tales for Adults," there's fodder for burgeoning bookworms, nostalgic grown-ups, and serious academics. Beloved classics like "Rumpelstiltskin," "Hansel and Gretel," and "Rapunzel" occupy the first section, whereas lesser-known tales like the grisly "How Children Played Butcher with Each Other" and the anti-Semitic "The Jew in the Brambles" are appropriately sequestered in the second. But despite the separation, Tatar is consistent in her scholarly examination of each storyâ??in illuminating introductions and annotations, she is equally comfortable calling up the German philosopher Walter Benjamin, imagining how audiences might respond to particular passages, and providing cross-references to other stories. This rich and valuable edition brilliantly showcases the brothers' storytelling acumen, and reinforces their tales as timeless for both children and for scholars. Illus. (Oct.) [Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Fifty-two tales, many well-known and loved, some unfamiliar, and nine specifically for adults, are extensively illustrated with art from the works of Arthur Rackham, Walter Crane, Wanda Gag, Leslie Brooke, and others. Each tale is accompanied by copious annotations that highlight the changes from one Grimm edition to another, views and translations of other scholars, and Tatar's own historical or cultural analysis. The preface, expanded from one and a half pages in the 2004 edition to six pages here, is a discussion of the significance of fairy tales that, through many retellings, have a "shared cultural repertoire." A.S. Byatt's thought-provoking introduction is a personal homage to the genre and discusses the conceits found in the tales, the psychological need in all societies for "untrue stories," and an appreciation of their magic and mystery. The section called "Reading the Grimms" is a look at the origin of the tales, including Asian and European variants, and the brothers' method of collecting. A biographical section includes information about the men's personal lives, their interest in law and politics, and their other literary pursuits. The last section is a delightful compilation of brief essays by fairy-tale fans about the usefulness, delight, and pervasiveness of the tales. Rounding out the collection are an extensive bibliographies of books and illustrations. Academic enough for the scholarly and thoroughly engaging enough for general readers, this browsable collection will enchant fairy-tale lovers everywhere.—Jackie Gropman, formerly at Chantilly Regional Library, VA [Page 121]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Celebrating the 200th anniversary of the publication of Children's Stories and Household Tales, this new edition includes classic stories such as “Cinderella,” “Rapunzel” and “Snow White” as well as six new entries, each with annotations exploring the tales' historical and cultural context. 10,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Celebrating the two hundreth anniversary of the publication of "Children's Stories and Household Tales," this new edition includes such classic stories as Cinderella, Rapunzel, and Snow White as well as six new entries, each with annotations exploring the tales' historical and cultural context.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Of all of the rich fairy-tale collections that exist in countries throughout the world, few are better known than those gathered almost two centuries ago by a pair of German brothers—Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm—in their Children’s Stories and Household Tales, first published in 1812. Endlessly recast and reimagined in poetry and prose, on the screen and onstage, these stories are forever etched in our imagination. Here, in this bicentennial edition of The Annotated Brothers Grimm, Maria Tatar presents these timeless stories in a sumptuous and visually powerful format that helps reshape our understanding of the Brothers Grimm.Drawing from the final authoritative version in the mid-nineteenth century, Tatar, an internationally recognized scholar in the field of folklore and children’s literature, has translated and provided commentary for more than fifty Grimm stories, judiciously selecting tales that resonate with modern audiences and reveal the broad thematic range of the Grimm canon. Readers young and old will encounter popular classics, including “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Cinderella,” “Snow White,” and “Rapunzel,” while discovering some of the lesser known yet equally captivating stories such as “Four Artful Brothers,” “The Water of Life,” and “The White Snake,” all new to this edition. Perhaps most noteworthy is Tatar’s decision to include tales excised from later editions, including a number of “adult” stories that were removed once the Grimms realized that parents were reading the stories to children.Tatar’s own translations are accompanied by insightful annotations that search for origins, uncover cultural complexities, and explore psychological effects. Nearly two hundred images of exquisite beauty, many of them new to this edition—by artists such as George Cruikshank, Gustave Doré, Kay Nielsen, and Arthur Rackham—are reproduced alongside the stories. With a brilliant introductory essay by A. S. Byatt, along with the Grimms’ original prefaces to their editions, a collection of reminiscences about “The Magic of Fairy Tales,” and essays on the lives of the Brothers Grimm and the cultural impact of their tales, The Annotated Brothers Grimm captures the magical appeal of the tales while also unlocking their potent mysteries.In the tradition of Bruno Bettelheim’s The Uses of Enchantment, this volume shows how the Grimms’ fairy tales animate our imaginations and remain with us long after we have put them aside. The Bicentennial Edition of The Annotated Brothers Grimm offers a treasury of cultural lore and wisdom that has been passed on from one generation to the next.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

"This is the book I wanted as a child and didn’t have, the book I’d have liked both to give to my children and to keep for myself, the book I shall give my grandchildren." —A. S. Byatt, from the introduction to The Annotated Brothers Grimm

Review by Publisher Summary 5

Children’s Stories and Household TalesThe Annotated Brothers GrimmDrawing from the final authoritative version in the mid-nineteenth century, Tatar, an internationally recognized scholar in the field of folklore and children’s literature, has translated and provided commentary for more than fifty Grimm stories, judiciously selecting tales that resonate with modern audiences and reveal the broad thematic range of the Grimm canon. Readers young and old will encounter popular classics, including “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Cinderella,” “Snow White,” and “Rapunzel,” while discovering some of the lesser known yet equally captivating stories such as “Four Artful Brothers,” “The Water of Life,” and “The White Snake,” all new to this edition. Perhaps most noteworthy is Tatar’s decision to include tales excised from later editions, including a number of “adult” stories that were removed once the Grimms realized that parents were reading the stories to children.The Annotated Brothers GrimmThe Uses of EnchantmentThe Annotated Brothers Grimm

Review by Publisher Summary 6

The Annotated Brothers Grimm