11 experiments that failed

Jenny Offill, 1968-

Book - 2011

A young child tries a series of wacky experiments, such as seeing if a piece of bologna will fly like a frisbee and determining whether seedlings will grow if watered with expensive perfume, and then must suffer the consequences of experiments gone awry.

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Location Call Number   Status
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Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Schwartz & Wade Books 2011.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
unpaged : ill
ISBN
9780375847622
0375847626
9780375957628
0375957626
Main Author
Jenny Offill, 1968- (-)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The curious and mischief-minded heroine from 17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore turns her attention to the scientific method. A typical experiment: "Question: Do dogs like to be covered in glitter? Hypothesis: Dogs like everything." Offill's matter-of-fact recounting ("What to Do: 1. Call dog. 2. Cover with glitter. 3. Let dog go") make for very funny reading and allow Carpenter to go all out with her collages, which create especially lively depictions of the protagonist's misadventures (and her mother's horror). Impressionable readers might be best advised: "Do not try this at home." Ages 4–8. (Sept.) [Page ]. Copyright 2011 PWxyz LLC

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 2—Beginning with a question followed by a hypothesis, an exuberant budding scientist follows what she believes to be logical steps in proving her theories in, alas, 11 experiments that fall short of expectations. Each of her tests includes a "What You Need" and "What to Do" list and concludes with "What Happened." From attempting to confirm that children can live on a snow and ketchup diet to sending a message in a bottle to the sea via the toilet, this enthusiastic child in her white lab coat, pink rubber gloves, and safety goggles has a never-give-up attitude, much to her mother's distress. Intriguing pen-and-ink and digital media illustrations are inventive themselves as they take readers through the various steps toward unfulfilled promise and sometimes unmitigated disaster. One humorous vignette appears in both this title and in this team's 17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore (Random, 2006): the same dog with the same long tongue licking food off the table. Though this book should come with a caution label: "Do NOT read this book to children who may perform these experiments," kids and adults will get a kick out of it.—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI [Page 92]. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

An imaginative youngster provides step-by-step instructions for 12 not-so-scientific experiments that are unlikely to produce favorable results, from ketchup-doused snowballs to dishes washed in a clothes washing machine. By the creators of 17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"This is a most joyful and clever whimsy, the kind that lightens the heart and puts a shine on the day," raved Kirkus Reviews in a starred review.Is it possible to eat snowballs doused in ketchup—and nothing else—all winter? Can a washing machine wash dishes? By reading the step-by-step instructions, kids can discover the answers to such all-important questions along with the book's curious narrator. Here are 12 "hypotheses," as well as lists of "what you need," "what to do," and "what happened" that are sure to make young readers laugh out loud as they learn how to conduct science experiments (really!). Jenny Offill and Nancy Carpenter—the ingenious pair that brought you 17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore—have outdone themselves in this brilliant and outrageously funny book.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

"This is a most joyful and clever whimsy, the kind that lightens the heart and puts a shine on the day," raved Kirkus Reviews in a starred review.Is it possible to eat snowballs doused in ketchup—and nothing else—all winter? Can a washing machine wash dishes? By reading the step-by-step instructions, kids can discover the answers to such all-important questions along with the book's curious narrator. Here are 12 "hypotheses," as well as lists of "what you need," "what to do," and "what happened" that are sure to make young readers laugh out loud as they learn how to conduct science experiments (really!). Jenny Offill and Nancy Carpenter—the ingenious pair that brought you 17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore—have outdone themselves in this brilliant and outrageously funny book.