Bink and Gollie

Kate DiCamillo

Book - 2010

Two roller-skating best friends--one tiny, one tall--share three comical adventures involving outrageously bright socks, an impromptu trek to the Andes, and a most unlikely marvelous companion.

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Children's Room jREADER/DiCamillo, Kate Due Jun 11, 2022
Children's Room jREADER/DiCamillo, Kate Due Jun 11, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Readers (Publications)
Published
Somerville, Mass. : Candlewick Press 2010.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
81 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm
ISBN
9780763632663
076363266X
Main Author
Kate DiCamillo (-)
Other Authors
Alison McGhee, 1960- (-), Tony Fucile (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

From two high-profile authors and an award-winning illustrator comes this zany hybrid of picture book, graphic novel, and early reader that introduces an endearing new pair of odd-couple friends. Short, blond, sprout-haired Bink and tall, tidy Gollie are complete opposites, but they're also devoted pals who visit each other every day: Bink from her tiny rustic cottage; Gollie from her sleek, chic tree house filled with mid-twentieth-century furniture. Three episodes explore common friendship dilemmas: in the first, the girls discuss the meaning of compromise; next, Gollie longs for personal space; and finally, Bink's new pet sparks Gollie's jealousy. Reality is gleefully suspended here; parents and school don't seem to exist. Although the scenes don't quite combine into a developed story, the repetition of phrases and appealingly oddball elements (roller skates, pancakes, rainbow socks) create a sense of cohesion, while Fucile's expressive, cartoon-style drawings, including several wordless spreads, extend the sense of character, story, and madcap adventure. Children will have fun filling in all the spaces this high-spirited, quirky, and warmhearted offering leaves to the imagination.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Think Pippi Longstocking meets The Big Bang Theory, and you'll have a good idea of the mood and quirky heroines of this first entry in what promises to be a wholly original chapter book series. Gollie is reed thin, geeky, and archly judgmental; Bink is petite and down to earth. Like all best friends, they know each other too well and can't live without one another, and in three short adventures, they squabble about novelty socks ("The problem with Gollie," Bink observes, "is that it's either Gollie's way or the highway. My socks and I have chosen the highway"), personal boundaries, and pets ("I must inform you that you are giving a home to a truly unremarkable fish," says Gollie). The plots serve mostly as a framework for DiCamillo and McGhee's sharp, distinctly ungirly dialogue that makes every page feel like a breath of fresh air. And true to his background as an animator for Pixar and Disney, Fucile makes his inklike digital illustrations crackle with energy and sly humor--it's not surprising that the man who helped create The Incredibles' Edna Mode has made these two prickly personalities irresistible. Ages 6–9. (Sept.) [Page ]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 1–3—In three humorous interconnected stories, Gollie, a self-confident girl who lives in a fashionable, contemporary house, and Bink, her rumpled but lovable, impish friend, are adventure-seeking companions, each with her own strong will. In the first tale, Bink's outrageous socks offend Gollie's sartorial eye, but the two compromise for friendship's sake. The second story sends Gollie on an imagined climb up the Andes, shutting Bink out of the house until she arrives at the door with a sandwich, which they share on top of the "mountain." In the final episode, Gollie is jealous of Bink's new pet fish until Bink reassures her that no one can take her place. All three stories, written with short sentences, abundant dialogue, and some contemporary expressions, offer delightful portrayals of two headstrong characters who, despite their differences and idiosyncratic quirks, know the importance of true friendship. The delightful digitalized cartoon illustrations—mostly black and white, with color used for the two characters and in strategic splashes throughout—reinforce the humor of the text. Filled with movement, they successfully portray the protagonists' changing moods. Elementary listeners and readers will have no trouble relating to the two friends' antics and the bond they share.—Nancy Menaldi-Scanlan, The Naples Players, FL [Page 74]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The Newbery Medal-winning author of The Tale of Despereaux and the award-winning author of Someday present the adventures of two precocious girls who don bright socks and rollers skates for an imaginative trip to the Andes. Illustrated by the creator of the SLJ Best Book of the Year, Let's Do Nothing! 125,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Two roller-skating best friends--one tiny, one tall--share three comical adventures involving outrageously bright socks, an impromptu trek to the Andes, and a most unlikely marvelous companion.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Winner of the 2011 Theodor Seuss Geisel Award! In a brilliant collaboration, best-selling authors Kate DiCamillo and Alison McGhee, along with acclaimed illustrator Tony Fucile, introduce an outrageously funny pair of friends.Meet Bink and Gollie, two precocious little girls — one tiny, one tall, and both utterly irrepressible. Setting out from their super-deluxe tree house and powered by plenty of peanut butter (for Bink) and pancakes (for Gollie), they share three comical adventures involving painfully bright socks, an impromptu trek to the Andes, and a most unlikely marvelous companion. No matter where their roller skates take them, at the end of the day they will always be the very best of friends. Full of quick-witted repartee, this brainchild of Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo and award-winning author Alison McGhee is a hilarious ode to exuberance and camaraderie, imagination and adventure, brought to life through the delightfully kinetic images of Tony Fucile.