The three little pigs An architectural tale

Steven Guarnaccia

Book - 2010

In this retelling of the classic tale, the three little pigs build homes inspired by the signature houses of famed architects, Frank Gehry, Phillip Johnson, and Frank Lloyd Wright, and fill the interiors with furnishings by renowned designers, piquing the interest of a certain evil wolf.

Saved in:
1 copy ordered
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Abrams Books for Young Readers 2010.
Language
English
Item Description
Originally published: Italy : Maurizio Corrdini, 2009.
Labeled drawings of iconic houses and objects by noted architects and designers on endpapers.
Physical Description
unpaged : col. ill. ; 33 cm
ISBN
9780810989412
0810989417
Main Author
Steven Guarnaccia (-)
Review by Booklist Reviews

As in Goldilocks and the Three Bears: A Tale Moderne (2000), Guarnaccia combines a delightfully fractured fairy tale with an ultrastylish, kid-friendly primer of twentieth-century design. Here, each of the three little pigs is a porcine doppelgänger for a world-famous architect: Frank Gehry (who lives in a house of scraps), Philip Johnson (whose house is glass), and Frank Lloyd Wright, whose sturdy, brick Fallingwater becomes the pigs' refuge from the wolf. The story works without the sophisticated references, but the endpapers, printed with design icons featured on the pages, provide a fun, interactive game and will pique kids' interest in the subject. Copyright 2009 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Guarnaccia (Goldilocks and the Three Bears: A Tale Moderne) models the familiar piggy homebuilders on Frank Gehry, Philip Johnson, and Frank Lloyd Wright. The three leave their mother's home--a bungalow styled after Charles and Henry Greene's Gamble House--to design their own structures. The Gehry pig (not yet the Gehry who designs swooping, iridescent pavilions) builds a 1970s style "house of scraps" that a spiky-haired, leather-jacketed wolf gladly deconstructs. The Johnson pig, identifiable by his black-framed spectacles, creates a glass house that the punk wolf reduces to shards. The pigs run to their brother's house of "stone and concrete," a Fallingwater look-alike that the wolf cannot budge. (If the wolf went after the cantilevering system, this tale might end differently.) Of the trio, Guarnaccia favors Wright, and the puckish architect outwits the wolf on several occasions. He plays to design fans, decorating the pigs' homes with objects by the likes of Noguchi and Starck, and his endpapers provide a visual index to the allusions. Without a background in "starchitects," though, children will need a design history lesson to appreciate this retelling. Ages 4–up. (June) [Page ]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

In this retelling of the classic tale, the three little pigs build homes inspired by the signature houses of famed architects, Frank Gehry, Phillip Johnson, and Frank Lloyd Wright, and fill the interiors with furnishings by renowned designers, piquing the interest of a certain evil wolf.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

In this retelling of the classic tale, the three little pigs build homes inspired by the signature houses of famed architects Frank Gehry, Phillip Johnson, and Frank Lloyd Wright, and fill the interiors with furnishings by renowned designers, piquing the interest of a certain evil wolf.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Presents a version of the traditional tale of the three little pigs in which the pigs each use a flair for design to build homes based on signature buildings from prominent architects Frank Gehry, Phillip Johnson, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

In this quirky, artsy retelling of "The Three Little Pigs," the pigs and their homes are nods to three famous architects -- Frank Gehry, Phillip Johnson and Frank Lloyd Wright -- and their signature homes and playfully follows the destruction of two of the houses by a huffing and puffing wolf who has a surprise ending of his own.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

In this quirky, artsy retelling of “The Three Little Pigs,” the pigs and their homes are nods to three famous architects—Frank Gehry, Phillip Johnson, and Frank Lloyd Wright—and their signature homes. Each house is filled with clever details, including furnishings by the architects and their contemporaries. Of course, not all the houses are going to protect the pigs from the wolf’s huffing and puffing. Which one will? The wolf, and readers, are in for a clever surprise ending.