Birmingham Sunday

Larry Dane Brimner

Book - 2010

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Subjects
Published
Honesdale, PA : Calkins Creek c2010.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
48 p. : ill., ports. ; 26 x 29 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781590786130
1590786130
Main Author
Larry Dane Brimner (-)
Review by Booklist Reviews

This moving photo-essay covers much more than just an account of the Birmingham, Alabama, Baptist Church bombing that killed four young girls in 1963. The detailed text, illustrated with black-and-white photos on every spacious double-page spread, sets the shocking assassination of the children within a general overview of both the racist segregation of the times and the struggle against it. The civil rights history includes the start of the NAACP, the resistance of Rosa Parks, sit-ins at lunch counters, the leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and more. Also included are specific examples of racist hatred, including Police Commissioner Connor's order to use fire hoses on young African American children. One of the most shocking photos shows Klan members at a rally with their children in full regalia. Final pages feature full-page biographies with small portraits of each of the four girls as well as the two young boys who died on the streets. Many readers will use the extensive source notes and bibliography that close this close view of that tragic Sunday. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 6 Up—September 16, 1963, was one of the most horrific days in American history. On a quiet Sunday morning, the Sixteenth Street Baptist church was bombed, and four little girls were killed. The author successfully blends the facts of the event with the intense emotions of the period in order to bring it to life. The facts regarding Jim Crow, segregation, as well as civil rights successes in bus integration and the Brown v. Board of Education ruling are explored in order to provide the context for the tragic event. These facts propelled African Americans to become even more hopeful and determined to achieve equality while those who opposed equality between whites and blacks became even more invested in seeing their efforts fail at any cost. Thorough research that includes FBI files, police surveillance records, and primary-source documents gives a detailed and fascinating look at the intense, decades-long federal and state investigation. This information, accompanied by the personal reflections from both the families of the victims and the perpetrators, ensures that readers will never forget the human impact of this significant part of the Civil Rights Movement. The book is beautifully designed, with good-quality, black-and-white photos, informative captions, and pertinent pull quotes. A worthy addition to any collection.—Margaret Auguste, Franklin Middle School, Somerset, NJ [Page 174]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Describes the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in 1963 by Ku Klux Klan members, which killed four girls and sparked race riots in Birmingham, and discusses how the event contributed to the civil rights movement.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Describes the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in 1963 by Ku Klux Klan members, which killed four girls and sparked race riots in Birmingham, and discusses how the event contibuted to the civil rights movement.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Racial bombings were so frequent in Birmingham that it became known as "Bombingham." Until September 15, 1963, these attacks had been threatening but not deadly. On that Sunday morning, however, a blast in the 16th Street Baptist Church ripped through the exterior wall and claimed the lives of four girls. The church was the ideal target for segregationists, as it was the rallying place for Birmingham's African American community, Martin Luther King, Jr., using it as his "headquarters" when he was in town to further the cause of desegregation and equal rights. Rather than triggering paralyzing fear, the bombing was the definitive act that guaranteed passage of the landmark 1964 civil rights legislation. Birmingham Sunday, a Jane Addams Children's Honor Book, NCTE Orbis Pictus Honor Book, and Kirkus Reviews Best Children's Book of the Year, centers on this fateful day and places it in historical context.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Jane Addams Children's Honor Book
NCTE Orbis Pictus Honor Book
Kirkus Reviews Best Children's Book of the Year

This nonfiction picture book focuses on Birmingham Sunday, a fateful day and significant part of the Civil Rights movement, and places it in historical context.


Racial bombings were so frequent in Birmingham, Alabama that it became known as "Bombingham." Until September 15, 1963, these attacks had been threatening but not deadly. On that Sunday morning, however, a blast in the 16th Street Baptist Church ripped through the exterior wall and claimed the lives of four girls. The church was the ideal target for segregationists, as it was the rallying place for Birmingham's African American community, Martin Luther King, Jr., using it as his "headquarters" when he was in town to further the cause of desegregation and equal rights. Rather than triggering paralyzing fear, the bombing was the definitive act that guaranteed passage of the landmark 1964 civil rights legislation.