Do nothing & do everything An illustrated new Taoism

Qiguang Zhao, 1948-

Book - 2010

"This introduction to ancient Taoism utilizes stories and illustrations to convey the subtle ideas that go beyond language as the author applies the Taoist Wu Wei (do nothing) and Wu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life"--Provided by publisher.

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

299.514/Zhao
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 299.514/Zhao Checked In
Subjects
Published
St. Paul, Minn. : Paragon House c2010.
Language
English
Physical Description
xvii, 249 p. : ill. ; 21 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (p. 241) and index.
ISBN
9781557788894
1557788898
Main Author
Qiguang Zhao, 1948- (-)
  • A manifesto of modern Taoism
  • Many thinkers, one Tao
  • Take it easy and take care
  • Take it easy, but take it
  • Wu wei
  • Wu bu wei
  • The universe and us
  • Reversing
  • Naming
  • Emptiness
  • Water
  • Calm down
  • Serenity and health
  • Eating
  • Sleeping
  • Do nothing, only breathe
  • Learning
  • Justice
  • Work and leisure
  • Fame and fortune
  • Beauty
  • Love
  • The intercourse between yin and yang
  • Ambition
  • Flying
  • Do nothing in this world
  • Walking
  • Tai chi boxing, doing nothing
  • Tai chi sword, doing everything
  • Happiness
  • No regret
  • Life and death
  • Appendix A: when the Red Guards knock
  • Appendix B: in memory of Hai Zi, who died for beauty
  • Appendix C: student contributions.
Review by Library Journal Reviews

Zhao (Chinese, Carleton Coll.) bases this work in part on a popular course he has taught on the Taoist path to health and longevity. He perceives the essence of the way of the Tao as something like a balance between nonaction and experience, while attempting to recognize the strengths and limitations of each. Neither a translation of the Tao te Ching nor a comprehensive guide to Chinese spirituality, Zhao's little book, peppered with informal pen sketches by the author himself, includes an appendix of contributions from his students. VERDICT This should make a nice supplement to the recent notable translations of Taoist sacred texts; a fine but not final resource for readers interested in Eastern religions. [Page 83]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The power of the Tao has accompanied the author through his journey as pupil during the Chinese Cultural Revolution to professor at an American liberal arts college. InDo Nothing and Do Everything he applies the ideas of Wu Wei (do nothing) andWu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life. Do Nothing and Do Everything is supplemented by observations of American and Chinese life. Rich and humorous illustrations convey the subtle ideas that go beyond language and are re-created in the same style as the ones the author draws impromptu on the blackboard in his classes. This introduction to ancient Taoism is conveyed in a lighthearted and humorous manner. This illustrated new Taoism will answer the widespread thirst for an alternative approach to life, and a longing for health, tranquility, and spiritual liberation.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

em>Do Nothing and Do Everything applies the ideas of Wu Wei (do nothing) andWu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

"This introduction to ancient Taoism utilizes stories and illustrations to convey the subtle ideas that go beyond language as the author applies the Taoist Wu Wei (do nothing) and Wu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life " --Provided by publisher.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

"Humorous, simple, and profound, Do Nothing and Do Everything demonstrates the convincing usefulness of Taoism in contemporary society. Both an erudite writer and a philosophical illustrator, Qiguang Zhao has built three bridges in one stroke: the first between the ancient and the modern, the second between the East and the West, and the third between words and pictures. Once you open this book, you will be drawn across these bridges to a relaxing, comforting, and inspiring wonderland, where you will rest in nothing and fly in everything."---Kang Liu, Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Duke University"He may talk about doing nothing, but Qiguang Zhao seems to do everything, as he deftly weaves various strands of Eastern and Western wisdom. The result is a gem, worthy of interest to those inclined to think outside our ethnocentric boxes."---James F. Fisher, Professor of Anthropology Royal Thimphu College, Bhutan"Profound and practical wisdom springs to life in this insightful account of the ancient and ever present Taoist teachings. Qiguang Zhao's gift as a storyteller combines with his deep understanding of Taoist principles to make this book enjoyable and instructive."---Judith Blackstone, author of The Enlightenment ProcessThe Power of the Tao has accompanied the author through the journey of his life, from student during the Chinese Cultural Revolution to professor at an American liberal arts college. In Do Nothing and Do Everything: An Illustrated New Taoism, Qiguang Zhao applies the ideas of Wu Wei (do nothing) and Wu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life.Rich and humorous illustrations convey the subtle ideas that go beyond language and are re-created in the same style as the ones the author draws impromptu on the blackboard in his classes. Do Nothing and Do Everything is supplemented by observations of American and Chinese life.This introduction to ancient Taoism is conveyed in a lighthearted and humorous manner. This illustrated new Taoism will answer the widespread thirst for an alternative approach to life, and a longing for health, tranquility, and spiritual liberation.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

Filled with drawings by the author and quotes from Chinese philosophers dating back to Lao Tzu himself, this appealing volume provides a clear, practical method for learning how to live in western society according to taoist principles. Zhao (Burton and Lily Professor of Chinese, Carleton College, Minn.) bases his book on a course on tai chi and taoism in modern life he's taught since 1997. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Review by Publisher Summary 6

The power of the Tao accompanied the author through his journey as pupil during the Chinese Cultural Revolution to professor at an American liberal arts college. In Do Nothing and Do Everything he applies the ideas of Wu Wei (do nothing) and Wu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life. Do Nothing and Do Everything is supplemented by observations of American and Chinese life. Rich and humorous illustrations convey the subtle ideas that go beyond language and are re-created in the same style as the ones the author draws impromptu on the blackboard in his classes. This introduction to ancient Taoism is conveyed in a lighthearted and humorous manner. This illustrated new Taoism will answer the widespread thirst for an alternative approach to life, and a longing for health, tranquility, and spiritual liberation.

Review by Publisher Summary 7

em>Do Nothing and Do Everything applies the ideas of Wu Wei (do nothing) and Wu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life.

Review by Publisher Summary 8

em>Do Nothing and Do Everything applies the ideas of Wu Wei (do nothing) and Wu Bu Wei (do everything) to modern life.