The bones you own A book about the human body

Rebecca Baines

Book - 2009

Presents facts about the 206 bones in the body.

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Series
A zig zag book
National Geographic kids
Subjects
Published
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic c2009.
Language
English
Physical Description
27 p. : col. ill. ; 20 cm
ISBN
9781426304118
1426304110
9781426304101
1426304102
Main Author
Rebecca Baines (-)
Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 2—These titles engage children through humor, clear language, interesting facts, and abundant photos. In the first book, Baines takes readers through the functions that bones perform in a human body. A caption reads, "Bonk! Your skull is like a helmet for your brain." The second volume opens with a picture of a generic egg about to hatch, illustrated with the word balloon, "Hello? Mom?" As explained in the next pages, it might contain a turtle or a fish or a butterfly. Maybe it's a swan. How about an alligator? All sorts of eggs are explained. Both books have two font sizes. The larger one is easier to read, while the smaller one might require adult help and explanation. Each one concludes with a spread of facts and questions to zigzag through and ponder. Excellent introductions for young science students.—Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI [Page 103]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Presents facts about the 206 bones in the body.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Simple text and photographs introduce bones, describing the different types, what body parts they protect, and how the number of bones in a baby's body changes as they grow older.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Why does a baby have about 350 bones, but his mom just over 200? Why are my bones hidden—not like a skeleton’s? And why does Mom say milk is good for my bones?

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Why does a baby have about 350 bones, but his mom just over 200? Why are my bones hidden—not like a skeleton's? And why does Mom say milk is good for my bones?