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FICTION/Woolf, Virginia
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Location Call Number   Status
1st Floor FICTION/Woolf, Virginia Due Aug 29, 2022
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Subjects
Published
New York : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich 1978.
Edition
1st Harvest/HBJ ed
Language
English
Item Description
Reprint of the ed. published by Harcourt, Brace, New York, 1931.
Physical Description
297 p. ; 20 cm
ISBN
0156949601
9780156949606
Main Author
Virginia Woolf, 1882-1941 (-)
Review by Publisher Summary 1

“I am made and remade continually. Different people draw different words from me.” Innovative and deeply poetic, The Waves is often regarded as Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece. It begins with six children—three boys and three girls—playing in a garden by the sea, and follows their lives as they grow up, experience friendship and love, and grapple with the death of their beloved friend Percival. Instead of describing their outward expressions of grief, Woolf draws her characters from the inside, revealing their inner lives: their aspirations, their triumphs and regrets, their awareness of unity and isolation.  

Review by Publisher Summary 2

'I am made and remade continually. Different people draw different words from me.' Innovative and deeply poetic, The Waves is often regarded as Virginia Woolf's masterpiece. It begins with six children'three boys and three girls'playing in a garden by the sea, and follows their lives as they grow up, experience friendship and love, and grapple with the death of their beloved friend Percival. Instead of describing their outward expressions of grief, Woolf draws her characters from the inside, revealing their inner lives: their aspirations, their triumphs and regrets, their awareness of unity and isolation.  

Review by Publisher Summary 3

“I am made and remade continually. Different people draw different words from me.” Innovative and deeply poetic, The Waves is often regarded as Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece. It begins with six children—three boys and three girls—playing in a garden by the sea, and follows their lives as they grow up, experience friendship and love, and grapple with the death of their beloved friend Percival. Instead of describing their outward expressions of grief, Woolf draws her characters from the inside, revealing their inner lives: their aspirations, their triumphs and regrets, their awareness of unity and isolation.