The innocents abroad, or, The new pilgrim's progress Being some account of the steamship Quaker City's pleasure excursion to Europe and the Holy Land; with descriptions of countries, nations, incidents, and adventures as they appeared to the author

Mark Twain, 1835-1910

Book - 2007

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Subjects
Published
New York : Signet Classics c2007.
Language
English
Item Description
Originally published: Hartford, Conn. : American Pub., 1881.
Physical Description
xxviii, 532 p. ; 18 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (p. 531-532).
ISBN
9780451530493
0451530497
Main Author
Mark Twain, 1835-1910 (-)
Other Authors
Michael Meyer, 1945- (-), Leslie A. Fiedler
Review by Publisher Summary 1

With his trademark wit, the author provides a running commentary on his experiences traveling in Europe and the Middle East, poking fun at tourists and tour guides and revealing what happens when New Barbarians' encounter the Old World. Reissue.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Twain describes his experiences traveling in Europe and the Middle East, and pokes fun at tourists and tour guides.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

One of the most famous travel books ever written by an American, The Innocents Abroad is Mark Twain’s irreverent and incisive commentary on nineteenth century Americans encountering the Old World. Come along for the ride as Twain and his unsuspecting travel companions visit the Azores, Tangiers, Paris, Rome, the Vatican, Genoa, Gibraltar, Odessa, Constantinople, Cairo, the Holy Land and other locales renowned in history. No person or place is safe from Twain’s sharp wit as it impales both the conservative and the liberal, the Old World and the New. He uses these contrasts to “find out who we as Americans are,” notes Leslie A. Fiedler. But his travelogue demonstrates that, in our attempt to understand ourselves, we must first find out what we are not.   With an Introduction Michael Meyer and an Afterword by Leslie A. Fiedler

Review by Publisher Summary 4

One of the most famous travel books ever written by an American, The Innocents Abroad is Mark Twain’s irreverent and incisive commentary on nineteenth century Americans encountering the Old World. Come along for the ride as Twain and his unsuspecting travel companions visit the Azores, Tangiers, Paris, Rome, the Vatican, Genoa, Gibraltar, Odessa, Constantinople, Cairo, the Holy Land and other locales renowned in history. No person or place is safe from Twain’s sharp wit as it impales both the conservative and the liberal, the Old World and the New. He uses these contrasts to “find out who we as Americans are,” notes Leslie A. Fiedler. But his travelogue demonstrates that, in our attempt to understand ourselves, we must first find out what we are not.   With an Introduction Michael Meyer and an Afterword by Leslie A. Fiedler