The 3 bears and Goldilocks

Margaret Willey

Book - 2008

Goldilocks, ignoring her father's warning not to rush in where she does not belong, enters a cabin in the woods, cleans it to meet her standards, plucks from the porridge items unappealing to her before eating a bowlful, and falls asleep on the bed that suits her best.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Willey Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers 2008.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
unpaged : col. ill
ISBN
9781416924944
1416924949
Main Author
Margaret Willey (-)
Other Authors
Heather Solomon (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Willey hews close to the traditional story The Three Bears with a literary glance toward natural science that serves the humor of the story well. Goldilocks, bolder than most and very curious, scoots into the woods to find adventure, and discovers the cave-like cabin of the bears. Instead of old-fashioned crockery and furniture, the fair-haired adventurer discovers a floor strewn from corner to corner with leaves and berry stems and pine cones and fish bones and thick, brown fur, oatmeal with beetles and bark, and beds made with pine needles and feathers. Cleanup, snack, and nap ensue. Mixed-media (watercolor, collage, color pencils, acrylic and oil paint) illustrations depict a lushly locked, bright-eyed protagonist; woods made for exploring; and three good-natured bears who feel sorry that their housebreaker lacks fur, teeth, and claws. Goldilocks learned lesson is a satisfying and funny conclusion, worthy of the reader and storyteller. Willey s lively text and Solomon s expressive images shake the dust from this old tale and make it shiny new. Copyright Booklist Reviews 2008.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-Gr 3— Set in "the farthest reaches of the far north," this version of the tale features a plucky lass who, warned by her father "…not to rush headlong into places where you don't belong," nevertheless ventures into the forest and into the bears' messy "cabin," which she sweeps clean. Removing the beetles and other unappealing lumps from Baby Bear's porridge, she eats all of the cereal, then settles down on his small, soft bed for a short snooze. Returning from a walk, the bears, at first annoyed by the rearrangement of their domain, take pity on the "poor creature" they find sleeping in Baby Bear's bed, but Goldilocks reacts with fear and bolts the premises. There is a rustic feel to the illustrations, rendered in watercolor, collage, colored pencil, acrylic, and oil paint. The bears' residence is shown to be a sort of rustic hogan constructed of bent saplings, vines, and bark, the interior strewn with pieces of the outdoors and the remains of meals. Large bowls hold porridge dotted with dead beetles, lumps of grass, and other natural matter. Beds are made from blankets thrown over piles of leaves, feathers, and other forest detritus. Woven baskets and earthenware bowls and vases sit on and around a great stone fireplace. Written and illustrated by the same pair that created Clever Beatrice (S & S, 2001), this satisfying read-aloud offers a new twist on an old favorite.—Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH [Page 106]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Delves into what the Three Bears felt about Goldilocks after she broke into their home, ate their food, and slept in each of their beds, in an amusing twist to this classic tale told from the homeowner's perspective!

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Goldilocks, ignoring her father's warning not to rush in where she does not belong, enters a cabin in the woods, cleans it to meet her standards, plucks from the porridge items unappealing to her before eating a bowlful, and falls asleep on the bed that suits her best.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

We all know that Goldilocks has a lot to say about the Three Bears. Everything they have is either too hot or too cold or too big or too lumpy or too hard or too soft or too completely, absolutely wrong. Only one of them can get anything right! Just right, that is. But have you ever wondered, even for the littlest mini-second, what the Three Bears think about her? Well, it turns out those bears have a thing or two, or three, to say... Margaret Willey turns this fav-orite classic upside down...because there's always another side to the story....