How we know what we know about our changing climate Scientists and kids explore global warming

Lynne Cherry

Book - 2008

"This volume describes where scientists look to find evidence of climate change-- from changes in bird migration patterns and fruit blossom dates, to obtaining tree rings and mud cores-- and especially how students and other citizen-scientists are assisting to monitor climate change, as well as what can be done to mitigate global warming"--Provided by publisher.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room j551.6/Cherry Checked In
Subjects
Published
Nevada City, CA : Dawn Publications c2008.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
66 p. : col. ill., col. map ; 24 x 29 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (p. 60-62) and index.
ISBN
9781584691037
1584691034
9781584691044
1584691042
Main Author
Lynne Cherry (-)
Other Authors
Gary Braasch (-)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Veteran science writer Cherry and award-winning photographer Braasch team up to make climate change less frightening by showing children how to empower themselves as "citizen scientists." Cherry begins with a no-nonsense chapter about hypotheses and theories, facts versus belief. She goes on to explain how observation can help bring about climate-change strategies; the information about children involved with Project Budburst is particulary interesting. Along the way, there are examples of how nature is changing—from migrations to melting icecaps to rising coastlines—and how these changes have been observed. The second section, "Fitting the Clues Together," considers what scientists do with their information and notes successes that have been achieved (for example, species saved and reduction of carbon footprints) and ways kids can help reduce energy. The can-do emphasis helps to make the topic less depressing, and the intriguing color photographs are thoughtful and upbeat. Many scientists were called upon during the writing of this book, and it shows. Copyright 2008 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Meant to be like a youth version of Braasch's Earth Under Fire: How Global Warming Is Changing the World , this beautifully photographed global guide offers a look at how research in diverse fields leads to an understanding of the warming climate—and what children and adults are doing about it. The first and largest of the book's four sections, "Where We Find Clues About Climate Change," presents researchers, citizen scientists and schoolchildren examining the natural world and unearthing data about climate. Spreads jump from topic to topic, from rainforests to tree rings, oceanic mud samples to 800,000-year-old ice cores. The empowering "What Scientists and You Can Do" section provides practical, proactive suggestions, e.g., eating less meat, drinking tap instead of bottled water. While heavy on the jargon, Cherry (The Great Kapok Tree ) immediately and clearly defines all science terms. The book would be overwhelming to read in one sitting; kids and educators will find this timely information is best served up via its bite-sized chapters. Readers young and old looking to make a difference will appreciate the book's hopeful tone as well as its comprehensive resource lists. Ages 10-14. (Mar.) [Page 83]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 4–8— Cherry and Braasch introduce readers to scientists around the world whose research contributes to an understanding of the causes and consequences of global warming. They also describe the work of citizen scientists, including children, whose observations contribute to knowledge about important changes that are occurring. Studies range from documenting bloom dates of trees and flowers to extracting mud cores from the ocean floor. Small color photographs show the fieldwork and experiments of scientists and students. Even though many findings indicate a grim outlook for plant and animal life, including humans, if the current trends continue, the authors consistently note ways in which students can have a positive impact by making personal choices and influencing public policy. A concluding spread identifies the more than 40 scientists mentioned in the text. The book's wide-ranging exploration of scientific studies and the encouragement to people of every age to become citizen scientists and active participants for change make this a valuable purchase.—Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato [Page 155]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Describes where scientists look to find evidence of climate change--from changes in bird migration patterns to obtaining mud cores--and how students are assisting to monitor climate change.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"This volume describes where scientists look to find evidence of climate change--from changes in bird migration patterns and fruit blossom dates, to obtaining tree rings and mud cores--and especially how students and other citizen-scientists are assisting to monitor climate change, as well as what can be done to mitigate global warming"--Provided by publisher.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Describes where scientists look to find evidence of climate change--from alterations in tree rings to bird migration patterns--how students and other citizen-scientists can assist climate change monitoring and what can be done to mitigate global warming.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Learn more about what climate changes means and how it's affecting our planet in this climate book for kids!Climate change is a critical and timely topic of deep concern, here told in an age-appropriate manner, with clarity and hope. This activist book for kids shows children that they too can make a difference!When the weather changes daily, how do we really know that Earth's climate is changing? This climate change book for kids shows the science behind the headlines—evidence from flowers, butterflies, birds, frogs, trees, glaciers and much more, gathered by scientists from all over the world, sometimes with assistance from young "citizen-scientists." And here is what young people, and their families and teachers, can do to learn about climate change and take action!