Stone age boy

Satoshi Kitamura

Book - 2007

When a modern young boy is transported back in time to a Stone Age village, he learns all about a new way of life, in this entertaining combination of imagination and prehistoric facts.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Kitamura Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
Cambridge, Mass. : Candlewick Press c2007.
Edition
1st U.S. ed
Language
English
Physical Description
unpaged : ill
ISBN
9780763634742
0763634743
Main Author
Satoshi Kitamura (-)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Kitamura's (Me and My Cat? ) invites readers to explore the Stone Age with this accomplished story of a boy who falls through a hole in his dull, gray environment and somehow emerges into a grassy, wild world. There he meets a girl: "I don't think I looked like any of the boys she knew," he says as she feels his navy-blue pullover, inspects his pale-blue sneakers and tries on his glasses. She leads him to her family's settlement, where "people had no knives or forks, no plastic—not even any metal." In step-by-step, captioned illustrations, readers observe how to start a fire; dry meat on wooden racks; and warm liquid "by putting a red-hot stone into a leather bag." The tribe also spears a reindeer and dances to celebrate. "I joined in on air guitar," the boy jokes, jamming in the background. Without superfluous gore, Kitamura depicts dead caribou and draws Lascaux-like cave paintings that acknowledge the importance of animals. (The author pictures mammoths and other fauna on the end pages too, but only a bear participates in the drama.) An imaginative way to kindle interest in, and admiration for, the people of a far distant era. Ages 4-8. (Nov.) [Page 69]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 1–4— A modern boy tells how he trips in the woods and finds himself in a cave during the Stone Age. Om introduces him to her family and way of life, in spite of the fact that they don't understand one another's language. Many small drawings in ink and watercolor show how they made tools, used fire to cook their food, and hunted reindeer. These people have a surprisingly modern appearance, and the boy seems at home playing his air guitar at a celebration. Om shows him a cave, the walls of which are covered with lifelike animal paintings. A spread with the single word "Wow!" is just right. Evading a cave bear, the boy falls into a hole and returns to his own time. Years later, he becomes an archaeologist and searches for signs of Om's people. A time line and author's note give the historical basis of the story, and endpapers show different animals as they might have appeared in cave paintings. Show children the beautiful reproductions in Patricia Lauber's Painters of the Caves (National Geographic, 1998), and read this book along with Rafe Martin's Will's Mammoth (Putnam, l989) for a storytime of awe and wonder.—Mary Jean Smith, Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN [Page 90]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

When a modern young boy is transported back in time to a Stone Age village, he learns all about a new way of life, in this entertaining combination of imagination and prehistoric facts.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

When a modern young boy is transported back in time to a Stone Age village, he learns all about a new way of life.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Step back 15,000 years as a modern boy enters a Stone Age village and learns a few prehistoric tricks of the trade.One day a boy falls down a hole, and an amazing thing happens — when he wakes, he’s in a camp full of people wearing animal skins! Mixing flight of fancy with prehistoric facts, Satoshi Kitamura ushers us back to a time of surprising innovation and artistic expression, shown in cave paintings visible to this day.