No one belongs here more than you Stories

Miranda July, 1974-

Book - 2007

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FICTION/July, Miranda
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Location Call Number   Status
1st Floor FICTION/July, Miranda Due Aug 30, 2022
Subjects
Published
New York : Scribner c2007.
Language
English
Physical Description
205 p.
ISBN
9780743299411
9780743299398
Main Author
Miranda July, 1974- (-)
  • The shared piano
  • The swim team
  • Majesty
  • The man on the stairs
  • The sister
  • This person
  • It was romance
  • Something that needs nothing
  • I kiss a door
  • The boy from Lam Kien
  • Making love in 2003
  • Ten true things
  • The moves
  • Mon plaisir
  • Birthmark
  • How to tell stories to children.
Review by Booklist Reviews

July's collection of stories is a gem of unconventional storytelling. Comparisons to Lorrie Moore only get the potential reader halfway there; one must add Karen Finley's meditations and Douglas Coupland's painful self-exploration. July's unadorned prose has a conversational tone, sounding like overheard bus conversations. The disaffected are well represented in such stories as "Something That Needs Nothing" and "The Swim Team," but July is at her best when she takes it a step further. The merely marginal individual borders on the grotesque in "Majesty," about a middle-aged woman's strange obsession with Prince William, and in "Mon Plaisir," with its odd and strangely removed discussion of a couple's odd sexuality. However, the most powerful piece in the collection, "This Person," is told by an unseen narrator. "Someone" gets--and rejects--"her one chance to be loved by everyone," and the story of this opportunity and how it is dismissed is told in a detached, dreamlike narrative. ((Reviewed January 1 & 15, 2007)) Copyright 2007 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

A filmmaker (Me and You and Everyone We Know ) and multimedia artist (www.learningtoloveyoumore.com ), July brings her trademark whimsy to this debut story collection. The protagonists here are lonely dreamers, and what they dream about is often a little creepy: a territorial type, wondering whether she is getting her money's worth out of the patio she has to share, falls asleep while her neighbor has a seizure on the bench beside her; a middle-aged woman fantasizes about seducing Prince William to the sounds of Mike and the Mechanics; a disgruntled secretary goes to absurd lengths to befriend her boss's wife. Betrayals small and large seem to be the norm, and inappropriate sex abounds: student-teacher, therapist-patient, consensual incest, molestation. Some of these couplings are startling, but others are clichs that drag down an otherwise witty and unusual book. The best moments here are small—a spectacular failure in sewing class, an unexpected visit from a neighborhood boy, a lost dog named Potato—and as they accrue the collection becomes an exhilarating read.—Leora Bersohn, doctoral student, Columbia Univ., New York [Page 61]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

It's a testament to July's artistry that the narrators of this arresting first collection elicit empathy rather than groans. "Making Love in 2003," for example, follows a young woman's dubious trajectory from being the passive, discarded object of her writing professor's attentions to seducing a 14-year-old boy in the special-needs class she teaches, while another young woman enters the sex industry when her girlfriend abandons her, with a surprising effect on the relationship. July's characters over these 16 stories get into similarly extreme situations in their quests to be loved and accepted, and often resort to their fantasy lives when the real world disappoints (which is often): the self-effacing narrator of "The Shared Patio" concocts a touching romance around her epilectic Korean neighbor; the aging single man of "The Sister" weaves an elaborate fantasy around his factory colleague Victor's teenage sister (who doesn't exist) to seduce someone else. July's single emotional register is familiar from her film Me and You and Everyone We Know , but it's a capacious one: wry, wistful, vulnerable, tough and tender, it fully accommodates moments of bleak human reversals. These stories are as immediate and distressing as confessionals. (May) [Page 31]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The creator and star of Me and You and Everyone We Know presents a collection of short works featuring profoundly sympathetic protagonists whose inherent sensitivities render them particularly vulnerable to unexpected events. Reprint. 100,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Presents a collection of short works featuring sympathetic protagonists whose inherent sensitivities render them particularly vulnerable to unexpected events.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Award-winning filmmaker and performing artist Miranda July, whose new movie Kajillionaire is in theatres now, brings her extraordinary talents to the page in this startling, sexy, tender, and bestselling debut collection.In No One Belongs Here More Than You, Miranda July gives the most seemingly insignificant moments a sly potency. A benign encounter, a misunderstanding, a shy revelation can reconfigure the world. Her characters engage awkwardly—they are sometimes too remote, sometimes too intimate. With great compassion and generosity, July reveals her characters’ idiosyncrasies and the odd logic and longing that govern their lives. No One Belongs Here More Than You is a stunning debut, the work of a writer with a spectacularly original and compelling voice.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Award-winning filmmaker and performing artist Miranda July, whose new movie Kajillionaire is in theatres now, brings her extraordinary talents to the page in this startling, sexy, tender, and bestselling debut collection.In No One Belongs Here More Than You, Miranda July gives the most seemingly insignificant moments a sly potency. A benign encounter, a misunderstanding, a shy revelation can reconfigure the world. Her characters engage awkwardly'they are sometimes too remote, sometimes too intimate. With great compassion and generosity, July reveals her characters' idiosyncrasies and the odd logic and longing that govern their lives. No One Belongs Here More Than You is a stunning debut, the work of a writer with a spectacularly original and compelling voice.