Glaciers Nature's icy caps

David L. 1937- Harrison

Book - 2006

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Series
Earthworks
Subjects
Published
Honesdale, Pa. : Boyds Mills Press 2006.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
unpaged : col. ill
ISBN
1590783727
Main Author
David L. 1937- Harrison (-)
Other Authors
Cheryl Nathan, 1958- (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Gr. 1-3. Harrison's volume from the Earthworks series provides a straightforward introduction to glaciers. Opening with the sinking of the Titanic, he explains how they form, move, and drop icebergs into the sea, going on to discuss where glaciers can be found and how their range shifts as Earth cycles in and out of ice ages. Although strung out on the page in free-verse-style columns, which may slow down some readers, the text reads like clear, informational prose. Nathan's digital illustrations vary in quality, but the best double-page spreads, such as the picture of a glacier showing an iceberg above and below the water's surface, are exceptionally fine. The two large maps are also quite effective. A solid choice for science collections, the book concludes with an information-packed author's note and a brief list of recommended books. ((Reviewed April 1, 2006)) Copyright 2006 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 2 This slim series entry takes a look at glaciers from the Ice Age to the Titanic disaster. Harrison includes facts on glacial formation, physical properties, and geological history. He has a poetic grasp of the kind of animated language that hooks young readers into nonfiction, yet his narrative is hindered by some inconsistencies and confusing usage. The pronunciation is given for the word calving, but not for words like Beringia or equator, and the author confusingly interchanges the terms iceberg and glacier. The discussion of Earth's warming trend and the melting glaciers makes it sound as though this is all part of a normal cycle. While the art technique is original, the illustrations are not always effective. The rendering of the Titanic hitting an iceberg works well in captivating children's attention, but the geological effects of melting glaciers are less clearly depicted. Source notes are not provided, and the author's note is geared toward older readers. There is a minimal section on further reading, but no glossary is offered to reinforce terms mentioned. Look to Roy A. Gallant's Glaciers (Watts, 1999), which has color photographs and a clearer text.Michael Santangelo, Brooklyn Public Library, NY [Page 105]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

An exciting look at one of the earth's most extraordinary forces of nature reveals how glaciers--enormous and destructive sheets of ice--have impacted our planet.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Introduces glaciers, describing the different types, their formation, their effects on the land, and their benefits.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The seventh book in the Earthworks series offers a fascinating introduction to icy caps that have changed the face of our planet. Glaciers are powerful forces of nature—tremendous sheets of ice that can weigh millions of tons, crush boulders, and flatten forests. Some slide down to meet the sea, break off, and form icebergs. Greenland, home to the largest glacier on earth, forms more than 40,000 icebergs each year, including the infamous one that sunk the Titanic. A lively look at one of the earth's remarkable phenomena.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

The seventh book in the Earthworks series offers a fascinating introduction to icy caps that have changed the face of our planet. Glaciers are powerful forces of nature—tremendous sheets of ice that can weigh millions of tons, crush boulders, and flatten forests. Some slide down to meet the sea, break off, and form icebergs. Greenland, home to the largest glacier on earth, forms more than 40,000 icebergs each year, including the infamous one that sunk the Titanic. A lively look at one of the earth's remarkable phenomena.