The money book for the young, fabulous & broke

Suze Orman

Book - 2005

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

332.024/Orman
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 332.024/Orman Checked In
Subjects
Published
New York : Riverhead Books 2005.
Language
English
Physical Description
395 p.
Bibliography
Includes index.
ISBN
1573222976
Main Author
Suze Orman (-)
Review by Library Journal Reviews

From an expert: money basics for beginners. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

With more than 6.5 million books in print (nearly three million of The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom alone), an eponymous CNBC show, contributing editorships at O: The Oprah Magazine and Costco Magazine and a biweekly Yahoo! column, Orman commands a great deal of economic bandwidth. This seventh book will be released with a PBS special (her fourth) pitched specifically to 20- and 30-somethings early in their working lives, who are, to put it nicely, having trouble negotiating a challenging economy: "Our starting point is that you are broke, by your or any definition." In the bright, clipped, supportive-but-not-mushy affirmative diction that dominates motivational business titles, Orman lays out a plan for maximizing the little that one has, focusing on ways to raise one's FICO score as a means of making more choices available. ("FICO" stands for the mysterious Fair Isaac Corporation-with whom Orman has an arrangement for her own FICOkit.) She runs through a plethora of money problems and what to do about them: credit card debt, student loans, mortgages (and advice on real estate), car payments, taxes, IRAs-almost anything one can think of that has to do with financial planning that can seem bewildering when presented by a salesperson, a direct mail solicitation or HR orientation. With its combination of specific solutions and deep knowledge of its target demographic's specific problems, this book positions itself perfectly and will see correspondingly strong sales among its coveted 18-34s. Agent, Amanda Urban at ICM. (Mar. 1) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Addresses personal finance issues that are of relevance to today's world of high debt and disproportionate lifestyles, addressing such topics as credit cards, student loans, credit scores, insurance, and mortgages.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The author of The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom addresses personal finance issues that are of relevance to today's world of high debt and disproportionate lifestyles, addressing such topics as credit cards, student loans, credit scores, insurance, and mortgages. 350,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Be sure to catch Suze Orman's latest PBS special based on The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous & Broke, which will air the weekend of March 4th on stations across the country. Check your local listings for airtimes. The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous & Broke is financial expert Suze Orman's answer to a generation's cry for help. They're called "Generation Debt" and "Generation Broke" by the media — people in their twenties and thirties who graduate college with a mountain of student loan debt and are stuck with one of the weakest job markets in recent history. The goals of their parents' generation — buy a house, support a family, send kids to college, retire in style — seem absurdly, depressingly out of reach. They live off their credit cards, may or may not have health insurance, and come up so far short at the end of the month that the idea of saving money is a joke. This generation has it tough, without a doubt, but they're also painfully aware of the urgent need to take matters into their own hands. The Money Book was written to address the specific financial reality that faces young people today and offers a set of real, not impossible solutions to the problems at hand and the problems ahead. Concisely, pragmatically, and without a whiff of condescension, Suze Orman tells her young, fabulous & broke readers precisely what actions to take and why. Throughout these pages, there are icons that direct readers to a special YF&B domain on Suze's website that offers more specialized information, forms, and interactive tools that further customize the information in the book. Her advice at times bucks conventional wisdom (did she just say use your credit card?) and may even seem counter-intuitive (pay into a retirement fund even though your credit card debt is killing you?), but it's her honesty, understanding, and uncanny ability to anticipate the needs of her readers that has made her the most trusted financial expert of her day. Over the course of ten chapters that can be consulted methodically, step-by-step or on a strictly need-to-know basis, Suze takes the reader past broke to a secure place where they'll never have to worry about revisiting broke again. And she begins the journey with a bit of overwhelmingly good news (yes, there really is good news): Young people have the greatest asset of all on their side — time.