True friends

Elissa Haden Guest

Book - 2001

Walter shows Iris how to make friends with his horse Rain, and in turn, Iris helps Walter deal with a problem at school.

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Series
Iris and Walter
Guest, Elissa Haden. Iris and Walter ; bk. 2.
Subjects
Genres
Readers (Publications)
Published
San Diego : Harcourt 2001.
Language
English
Item Description
"Gulliver Books."
Physical Description
44 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm
ISBN
0152021213
Main Author
Elissa Haden Guest (-)
Other Authors
Christine Davenier (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Gr. 2-4. The first two chapters in this episodic book concern Iris, Walter, and Rain, a "fast and wild" horse. Iris longs to ride Rain; however, her initial overtures (yelling and offering cookies) scare the horse away. Iris tones down her approach and tries to please the horse, with great success. The remaining two chapters focus on the children's first two days of school. When his teacher shortens Walter's name, he's unhappy but unable to tell her so. Inspired by a friendly note from Iris, he comes up with a clever way to let his teacher know that he's Walter, not Walt. The tone of the stories is gentle but lively. Drawn in a breezy, spontaneous style, the ink sketches by Christine Davenier are washed with colorful tints for a casual effect that is quite disarming. An appealing set of stories for children who are beginning to venture beyond the easy-reading section. ((Reviewed May 1, 2001)) Copyright 2001 Booklist Reviews

Review by Booklist Reviews

Gr. 1-3. Iris' family has moved from the city to the country, and Iris is angry. The country is as lonely as Mars, and there's not much to do. She misses the city action and noise--the tango music from the next apartment, the whooshing sounds the city buses make, the rumbling of the subway. To make matters worse, Iris' parents are trying too hard to win her over. Grandpa is the only one who's not pressuring her to love country life. They take a walk and make a marvelous discovery--a rope ladder extending from the spreading branches of a huge tree, and a new friend, Walter. This fresh, humorous portrayal of a girl dealing with the confusing emotions that come with a move is right on target, and so is the resolution. Christine Davenier's exuberant pen-and-ink drawings reveal all the delightful things Iris discovers with Walter--riding a pony, walking barefoot in the cool grass, and spying a red-tailed hawk. An easy-to-read chapter book (the first of a series), just right for children ready to step up their skills. --Shelley Townsend-Hudson Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The dynamic duo that first met in the beginning reader Iris and Walter are back in Iris and Walter: True Friends by Elissa Haden Guest, illus. by Christine Davenier. With Walter's help, Iris slowly befriends a horse called Rain, then works up to riding her; and Iris heads to her new school. The two are as engaging as ever. (May) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Four gracefully paced chapters, stylish illustrations and a design that allows plenty of breathing room add up to a knockout kickoff to a beginning reader series. Guest (Girl Stuff) lays out the central conflict in the first sentence ("When Iris and Iris's family moved from the big city to the country, Iris was sad"). Davenier's (Leon and Albertine) corresponding pen-and-ink and watercolor-wash illustration takes up most of the spread: a car on a rural road drives into the sunset, as a crestfallen Iris gazes out the rear window, back toward the city. The rest of the first chapter evocatively recounts in just how many ways the girl pines for her former home (e.g., "the long hallway where she roller-skated on rainy days"; in the illustration she appears like Alice in Wonderland bursting out of the corridor). Iris's parents try to cheer her up, but only Grandpa knows what she needs. He helps Iris discover a new friend, Walter, and soon she is savoring country life. Guest forswears a pat resolution the city still occupies Iris's thoughts, conveyed with a skillful and unobtrusive use of repetition ("She dreamed of her noisy street and her wide front stoop. She dreamed of tango music and of roller skating down long hallways"). Guest's economic eloquence is in perfect sync with Davenier's elegant watercolor and ink drawings; the illustrator's urbane graphic sensibility and lush palette of blue and purple hues bring to mind vintage New Yorker covers. Ages 6-9. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Iris excitedly prepares to make her stage debut and helps Walter with his lines. But when the big day arrives, she awakens with a fever and must stay in bed; her teacher, however, prepares a surprise for Iris's return. Ages 6-9. (Apr.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Iris and Walter: The School Play by Elissa Haden Guest, illus. by Christine Davenier, follows the best buddies as Iris excitedly prepares to make her stage debut and helps Walter with his lines. But when the big day arrives, she awakens with a fever and must stay in bed; her teacher, however, prepares a surprise for Iris's return to school. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Iris excitedly prepares to make her stage debut and helps Walter with his lines. But when the big day arrives, she awakens with a fever and must stay in bed; her teacher, however, prepares a surprise for Iris's return. Ages 6-9. (Apr.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Iris and Walter: The School Play by Elissa Haden Guest, illus. by Christine Davenier, follows the best buddies as Iris excitedly prepares to make her stage debut and helps Walter with his lines. But when the big day arrives, she awakens with a fever and must stay in bed; her teacher, however, prepares a surprise for Iris's return to school. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-Gr 2-In the first two chapters of this easy-reader, Walter teaches Iris to win the trust of a horse so that she can fulfill her dream to ride Rain "over green meadows, down a path of pines, straight into the sparkling stream." Although Iris is brave enough to accomplish this feat, chapter three deals with her first-day jitters when starting a new school, and the support she receives from her family, classmate Walter, and their teacher. Next, she helps Walter communicate his wish to be called by his full name instead of Walt. This sequel to Iris and Walter (Harcourt, 2000) celebrates friendship, validates emotions, and exemplifies problem solving. While readers new to these characters aren't told that Iris recently moved to the country, that detail is not essential to understand these charming stories. Davenier's expert use of pen and ink on keacolor paper results in cartoon characters whose facial expressions and body language exude emotion. The vibrant colors flow with captivating hues and shadows, and several sweeping vistas are printed on double-page spreads. Treat beginning readers to this book about common childhood events and feelings.-Laura Scott, Baldwin Public Library, Birmingham, MI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 2-In this beginning chapter book, Iris has moved from the city to the country, and she is not impressed. There are no noises, no stoops to sit on, and seemingly, no children. Her parents encourage her to play in her new yard to no avail; it is her grandfather who finally takes her for a walk and she meets Walter in his tree house. The two become fast friends and Iris learns to appreciate country life. She rides the boy's pony, plays hide-and-seek, and rolls in the grass. The only flaw in the story is that when her pal asks her about life in the big city, all she has to say is, "there are lots and lots and lots of people." Walter replies that in the country "there are lots and lots and lots of stars," and the discussion abruptly ends there. The exchange seems stilted and preachy, and Walter appears to be either very wise or very boring. The pen-and-ink illustrations are a bit sloppy and have a limited palette of primarily greens, blues, and pinks. Overall, though, the story does work, showing the positive qualities of different lifestyles and that friends can be found anywhere.-Holly Belli, Bergen County Cooperative Library System, West Caldwell, NJ Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 2-Iris and Walter are excited about their parts in the school play about bugs. Iris practices and practices, and helps Walter with his lines, reassuring him when he forgets them at dress rehearsal. The day of the play, a devastated Iris has a fever and must stay home. She finds it difficult to return to class and hear all about the big event, but Walter helps her get through the day and her teacher brings in a special treat. The best surprise comes at the end, however, when Iris finds out the class will soon begin rehearsing for a dance about the solar system. Readers will relate to the child's situation and will be reassured by her supportive family and best friend. Pen-and-ink drawings done on keacolor paper convey the emotions of the story. This excellent addition to the series is a perfect choice for newly independent readers.-Melinda Piehler, North Tonawanda Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 2-Iris and Walter are excited about their parts in the school play about bugs. Iris practices and practices, and helps Walter with his lines, reassuring him when he forgets them at dress rehearsal. The day of the play, a devastated Iris has a fever and must stay home. She finds it difficult to return to class and hear all about the big event, but Walter helps her get through the day and her teacher brings in a special treat. The best surprise comes at the end, however, when Iris finds out the class will soon begin rehearsing for a dance about the solar system. Readers will relate to the child's situation and will be reassured by her supportive family and best friend. Pen-and-ink drawings done on keacolor paper convey the emotions of the story. This excellent addition to the series is a perfect choice for newly independent readers.-Melinda Piehler, North Tonawanda Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Best friends Iris and Walter know they can always rely on one another, so when Iris wishes to ride the wild horse, she looks to Walter for his assistance, in a colorfully illustrated easy reader.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Walter shows Iris how to make friends with his horse Rain, and in turn, Iris helps Walter deal with a problem at school.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Sometimes it takes two friends to solve a problem. So when Iris announces that she really wants to ride the wild horse Rain, Walter comes up with the perfect plan to help her. And when Walter has a terrible first day at school, Iris gives him a wonderful idea that makes school fun. After all, helping is what best friends do for each other!Join Iris and Walter in this charming second book in their new series. Elissa Haden Guest and Christine Davenier once again offer the delights that Publishers Weekly praised so lavishly in its review of the first installment of Iris and Walter's remarkable adventures: "Four gracefully paced chapters, stylish illustrations, and a design that allows plenty of breathing room add up to a knockout kickoff to a beginning reader series."