Giving thanks A Native American good morning message

Jake Swamp, 1941-

Book - 1995

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Series
Reading Rainbow feature book
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Lee & Low books c1995.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
unpaged : ill
ISBN
1880000156
Main Author
Jake Swamp, 1941- (-)
Other Authors
Erwin Printup, 1956- (illustrator)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The flat planes and saturated colors of Printup's highly stylized acrylic paintings form a handsome backdrop to this ancient Iroquois message of thanksgiving, adapted for children by a chief of the Mohawk nation. A salute to Mother Earth and all her beauty, the ``good morning message'' is traditionally delivered at the beginning of each day and at special ceremonies. Its simple, timeless language bears witness to the Native American reverence for the natural world and sense of unity with all living things (``We give thanks to green grasses that feel so good against our bare feet, for the cool beauty you bring to Mother Earth's floor"). The gifts of the earth (``good foods... our life sustainers''; ``Grandfather Thunder Beings'') are richly depicted in paintings of wildlife and bountiful harvests. Horizontal bands of color suggest receding landscapes, pristine skies and oceans. This eye-catching book, a debut for both author and artist, would pair well with Susan Jeffers's Brother Eagle, Sister Sky for a story-telling session. All ages. (Sept.) Copyright 1995 Cahners Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

"Simple, timeless language bears witness to the Native American reverence for the natural world," wrote PW of this Iroquois salute to Mother Earth. All ages. (Sept.) Copyright 1998 Publishers Weekly Reviews

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 3?Drawing on Six Nation (Iroquois) ceremonial tradition, the text speaks concise thanks to Mother Earth, to water, grass fruits, animals, to the wind and rain, sun, moon and stars, to the Spirit Protectors of our past and present, ``for showing us ways to live in peace and harmony,'' and to the Great Spirit, giver of all. The simplicity and familiarity of the message do not diminish the moving effect of the lengthening catalog of blessings. At first glance, the art, while colorful and very legible, seems overly conventional; closer inspection, however, reveals an interesting use of pattern in the faces of both humans and animals, variation between distant landscape and close-up still-life composition, and a satisfying buildup of momentum to the dramatic, fire-lit night scene of the final invocation to the spirits. The entire text is reproduced in Mohawk on the last page (without a pronunciation guide, alas). A brief prefatory note makes the very valuable suggestion that the giving of thanks should be a daily, rather than a rare, activity. This book is not just for the ``Native American shelf'': its contribution is more inspirational than ethnographic.?Patricia (Dooley) Lothrop Green, St. George's School, Newport, RI

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A traditional Iroquois celebration of the beauty and spirit of Mother Earth, as told by a contemporary Mohawk chief.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The Native American Thanksgiving Address, offered to Mother Earth in gratitude for her bounty and for the variety of her creatures, including human beings, is presented by a contemporary Mohawk chief who has delivered the address around the world.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A Native American thanksgiving address, offered to Mother Earth in gratitude for her bounty and for the variety of her creatures, including human beings