Majestic universe Views from here to infinity

Serge Brunier

Book - 1999

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Subjects
Published
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press 1999.
Language
English
French
Main Author
Serge Brunier (-)
Item Description
"First published in French as l'Univers"--T.p. verso.
Physical Description
216 p. : col. ill. ; 37 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (p. 213) and index.
ISBN
9780521663076
  • Foreword
  • 1. The history of cosmology
  • 2. The galaxy, an island in space
  • 3. A thousand generations of stars
  • 4. The next supernova
  • 5. Planets by the billion?
  • 6. The enigma at the heart of the Milky Way
  • 7. A sea of galaxies
  • 8. The architecture of the universe
  • 9. The Big Bang, and the history of the universe
  • 10. Gravitational lenses
  • 11. The mystery of the missing mass
  • 12. Searching for the ultimate
  • 13. Towards the cosmological horizon
  • Appendices
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • Bibliography
Review by Choice Review

This oversized coffee-table book includes more than 200 astronomical photographs (mostly of objects beyond the solar system), many of them taken by Brunier, a professional photographer in addition to being chief editor of the journal Ciel et Espace. The large format is actually a drawback, making the book difficult to hold and leading to many of the photographs being so highly enlarged that they appear blurry. For a book in which images play such an important role, it is unfortunate that there is so little information on how they were obtained. Only a single page of credits is offered, which does not generally specify even the telescope used--and the integration of the images with text is weak. Although there are minor errors, the book supplies an unusually knowledgeable overview of cutting-edge astronomical research, with references to results as recent as mid-1999. The writing (translated from the original French) is sometimes ponderous and breathless but is generally clear and understandable to a nonspecialist. It is impossible to strongly recommend this book, but it would be of some value to libraries wishing to update their collection of introductory astronomy books. General readers; undergraduates. T. Barker; Wheaton College (MA)

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.