Everyone poops

Taro Gomi

Book - 1993

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jE/Gomi
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Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
Brooklyn, N.Y. : Kane/Miller Book Publishers c1993.
Language
English
Main Author
Taro Gomi (-)
Item Description
Originally published in Japan under the title Minna Unchi by Fukuninkan Shoten, Tokyo, 1977.
Physical Description
27 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm
ISBN
9781797202648
9780613685726
9780916291457
Contents unavailable.
Review by Booklist Review

Ages 18 months-3. Since this was first published in Japan in 1978, it has apparently taken Americans 15 years to discover Everyone Poops. They won't forget it, however, not with pictures like these. Gomi's simple-shape watercolors prove that birds do it, bees do it, and every species in-between does it. Alongside or underneath the animal is the poop itself--little bitty mouse poop, great big elephant poop. For those more interested in their own species, there's a picture of a grown-up and an older child on toilets, a toddler on a potty, and a baby with a dirty diaper. If kids are even more curious (and some are), the text informs them that when it comes to poop, there are "different shapes, different colors, even different smells." A short book, but definitely to the point. ~--Ilene Cooper

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

"An elephant makes a big poop. A mouse makes a tiny poop," and so the text goes, describing all sorts of creatures and people who eat and thus defecate. Ages 18mos.-4yrs. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-- Well yes, they do, but does anyone really need an entire book on the subject? In this Japanese import, readers are informed on page one that ``an elephant makes a big poop, a mouse makes a tiny poop.'' Later on, they are told that it comes in different shapes, colors, and smells, and that, depending on who is doing it, it is done in different places. The summarizing statement is that ``all living things eat, so everyone poops.'' However, there is never any explanation offered as to why. Overall, the text is merely a series of rather dull pictures of back ends of people on toilets and animals, with captions identifying them and occasionally posing questions such as ``What does a whale's poop look like?'' (No answer is provided.) There is even a little joke: ``A one hump camel makes a one hump poop. And a two hump camel makes a two hump poop. Just kidding.'' I wish I were. --Denise L. Moll, Lone Pine Elementary School, West Bloomfield, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Horn Book Review

There's no mincing of words here. As the straightforward text explains, 'Fish poop / And so do birds /. . . . Grown-ups poop / Children poop too.' Unabashed illustrations show beasts and bugs doing it, a male figure on the toilet, and a baby with a soiled diaper. Some adults may be squeamish about the facts of life so honestly confronted, but younger children will find their curiosity satisfied, and those in the throes of toilet training will appreciate the book's directness. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Kirkus Book Review

This straightforward, graphic book was published in Japan in 1978. Whether the US is ready for its unblinking look at a subject that naturally fascinates children and is basic to toilet training remains to be seen. ``An elephant makes a big poop. A mouse makes a tiny poop,'' begins Gomi, depicting animals, birds, fish, and humans in boldly stylized forms silhouetted against origami-paper colors; their feces are appropriately shaped blobs. There's a lot to know: different shapes, colors, and smells (not described), while some animals stop but ``Others do it on the move.'' A child heading for ``a special place'' introduces a nonjudgmental comparison of adults and tots on toilets and potties with a baby on a diaper. The book concludes with a seven- animal lineup viewed fore (``All living things eat, so...'') and aft (``Everyone poops''). Candid and sensible. (Picture book. 2- 5) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.