Iranian love stories

Graphic Mundi (Firm)

Book - 2021

"A series of vignettes, in graphic novel format, that explore the lives of ten young Iranian men and women from diverse backgrounds"--

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955.061/Deuxard
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Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor New Shelf 955.061/Deuxard (NEW SHELF) Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Graphic novels
Published
University Park, Pennsylvania : Graphic Mundi [2021]
Language
English
French
Item Description
"Originally published in French under the following title: Love Story à l'iranienne by Jane Deuxard and Deloupy, © Editions Delcourt - 2016."
Physical Description
138 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
ISBN
9781637790045
163779004X
Corporate Author
Graphic Mundi (Firm) (-)
Other Authors
Deloupy, 1968- (artist), Ivanka Hahnenberger (translator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

"I assure you, this country is a paradise for women," a covered figure insists, her arms raised in a victorious V. But this is Iran, and her declaration doesn't quite resonate with the local population. Two journalists—a couple publishing under the collective pseudonym "Jane Deuxard" (cleverly suggesting an anonymous twosome)—interviewed young Iranians, working "covertly" as unwelcome visitors. Wearing rings (they're unmarried), with "Jane" veiled and garbed in a 3/4-length coat "like camouflage," the pair gathered "love stories," even escaping arrest. Gila still can't marry her one true love. Saviosh is willing to risk having his hand cut off to spend a weekend away with his girlfriend. Kimia and Zeinab are surprisingly able to laugh about their boyfriends. Tough questions propel Asha and Nima into discordant conversations. Saeedeh opens up about her arranged marriage. Soban visits prostitutes to escape from impending marriage. Jamileh can leave—but comes back. "Happiness is not allowed in Iran," one woman summarizes. Deloupy transforms the reportage into saturated, affecting art; Hahnenberger adroitly translates. Both enable Deuxard's testimony for amplified access. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

"I assure you, this country is a paradise for women," a covered figure insists, her arms raised in a victorious V. But this is Iran, and her declaration doesn't quite resonate with the local population. Two journalists—a couple publishing under the collective pseudonym "Jane Deuxard" (cleverly suggesting an anonymous twosome)—interviewed young Iranians, working "covertly" as unwelcome visitors. Wearing rings (they're unmarried), with "Jane" veiled and garbed in a 3/4-length coat "like camouflage," the pair gathered "love stories," even escaping arrest. Gila still can't marry her one true love. Saviosh is willing to risk having his hand cut off to spend a weekend away with his girlfriend. Kimia and Zeinab are surprisingly able to laugh about their boyfriends. Tough questions propel Asha and Nima into discordant conversations. Saeedeh opens up about her arranged marriage. Soban visits prostitutes to escape from impending marriage. Jamileh can leave—but comes back. "Happiness is not allowed in Iran," one woman summarizes. Deloupy transforms the reportage into saturated, affecting art; Hahnenberger adroitly translates. Both enable Deuxard's testimony for amplified access. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

In this bold and irresistible look at life under religious rule, a foreign journalist team (who are also a romantic couple) working under the pseudonym "Jane Deauxard" interview young adults in Iran about the private lives they're not supposed to have, which Deloupy (Algériennes) draws. One pair gets engaged on the sly while the woman's family holds out for an arranged marriage; another couple discovers during their interview how little they know about each other after years of covert meetings; two female friends dish about their secret boyfriends and argue that they have it better than Western women ("I'm a queen here!"); and a protest leader lies low after being arrested and tortured by the regime. Everything happens in secret: smoking, drinking, dating, parties, music ("When you live in Iran, I promise you, Pink Floyd lyrics resonate with you"), and, above all, sex. Behind the furtive, paranoid atmosphere hovers the shadow of the 2009 Green Movement, and its failure to produce lasting change, which seems to drain many interviewees of hope. Perspectives range from a woman who emerges from a police raid with an attitude of "I hate them more than I'm afraid of them," to a man who shrugs, "Freedom doesn't pay the rent." Deloupy's assured art is drenched in the warm colors of the Middle East. Secret lives shine through in this excellent work of comics journalism. (Dec.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"A series of vignettes, in graphic novel format, that explore the lives of ten young Iranian men and women from diverse backgrounds"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Gila, 26, was at a party when the police showed up. Themen were able to get away with bribes, but the women were taken to the station,and anyone who'd been drinking was forced to submit to a virginity test. Shenever went to another party after that.Zeinab is20 and she loves being a woman in Iran. She says that she feels like a queen!And despite all the risks, she confesses that she makes love with her boyfriendbecause the danger excites her.Vahid is 26. He wasa leader with the Green Movement. Then he watched his friend Neda die right infront of him. Now he keeps his head down, trying to finish hisstudies.In a series of vignettes based onclandestine interviews, this award-winning graphic novel explores the politicsand love lives of ten young Iranian men and women from diverse backgrounds. Theresult is an honest portrait of Iranian youth today and a rare glimpse into asociety where the sexes are strictly segregatedï¿9;and Westernjournalists aren't welcome. Through testimonies from across the country, welearn about traditional marriages, the pressures of living under the regime, andhow young people escape the police and defy tradition to live their lovestories.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A series of vignettes, in graphic novel format, that explore the lives of ten young Iranian men and women from diverse backgrounds.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Gila, 26, was at a party when the police showed up. The men were able to get away with bribes, but the women were taken to the station, and anyone who'd been drinking was forced to submit to a virginity test. She never went to another party after that.Zeinab is 20 and she loves being a woman in Iran. She says that she feels like a queen! And despite all the risks, she confesses that she makes love with her boyfriend because the danger excites her.Vahid is 26. He was a leader with the Green Movement. Then he watched his friend Neda die right in front of him. Now he keeps his head down, trying to finish his studies.In a series of vignettes based on clandestine interviews, this award-winning graphic novel explores the politics and love lives of ten young Iranian men and women from diverse backgrounds. The result is an honest portrait of Iranian youth today and a rare glimpse into a society where the sexes are strictly segregated'and Western journalists aren't welcome. Through testimonies from across the country, we learn about traditional marriages, the pressures of living under the regime, and how young people escape the police and defy tradition to live their love stories.