We are still here!

Traci Sorell

eBook - 2021

Twelve Native American kids present historical and contemporary laws, policies, struggles, and victories in Native life, each with a powerful refrain: We are still here! Too often, Native American history is treated as a finished chapter instead of relevant and ongoing. This companion book to the award-winning We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga offers readers everything they never learned in school about Native American people's past, present, and future. Precise, lyrical writing presents topic...s including: forced assimilation (such as boarding schools), land allotment and Native tribal reorganization, termination (the US government not recognizing tribes as nations), Native urban relocation (from reservations), self-determination (tribal self-empowerment), Native civil rights, the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), religious freedom, economic development (including casino development), Native language revival efforts, cultural persistence, and nationhood.

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Online Access
Instantly available on hoopla.
Cover image
Published
[United States] : Charlesbridge 2021.
Language
English
Physical Description
1 online resource
Format
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
ISBN
9781632899736
1632899736
Access
AVAILABLE FOR USE ONLY BY IOWA CITY AND RESIDENTS OF THE CONTRACTING GOVERNMENTS OF JOHNSON COUNTY, UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, HILLS, AND LONE TREE (IA).
Main Author
Traci Sorell (author)
Corporate Author
hoopla digital (-)
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* The creators of We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga (2018) here share important Native American concepts for younger readers. Using a framework of students giving presentations for an Indigenous Peoples' Day celebration, Sorell and Lessac devote a two-page spread to each report topic: "Assimilation," "Allotment," "The Indian New Deal," "Termination," "Relocation," "Tribal Activism," "Self-Determination," "Indian Child Welfare and Education," "Economic Development," "Language Revival," and "Sovereign Resurgence." For each, they define, offer examples of its use (often to the disadvantage of Indigenous peoples), and conclude with the refrain "We are still here!" "Allotment," for example, explains how the U.S. government passed laws that assigned small sections of land to tribal citizens and sold the "leftover" land to white Americans and the railroads; "Relocation" describes the government's encouragement of Indigenous peoples leaving tribal lands to resettle in cities, which resulted in many living in urban poverty. Lessac's vibrant gouache illustrations include many historic scenes, including of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, the occupation of Alcatraz Island, arguments before the Supreme Court to challenge policies that prohibited traditional religious practices, and efforts to strengthen tribal languages. Appended with further information, a time line, a glossary, and sources, this makes a perfect introduction for those too young for Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Debbie Reese, and Jean Mendoza's An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People (2019). Grades 2-4. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 4–6—Students at the Native Nations Community School share presentations about the history, present, and future of Indigenous communities. The vivid artwork features a simple, bold style. The narrative starts with a general introduction of Native Nations in the United States. Each presentation contains illustrations with the student's name, an overview of the subject, a brief list of the impact that the concept or historical moment had on Native American people, and the refrain "We Are Still Here!" The last pages show students and their families with a variety of skin tones and physical abilities studying the presentations on topics that include sovereign rights and relocation. Additional information, a time line, a glossary, sources, and an author's note offer further context. The lyrical text and jewel-tone illustrations elegantly work together to stirringly portray the ongoing fight for Native American recognition and rights. VERDICT An essential purchase for introducing the impact laws and treaties had and continue to have on Native Nations.—Tamara Saarinen, Pierce County Lib., WA Copyright 2021 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"A group of contemporary Native American kids from different tribes presents twelve time periods, struggles, and victories in their collective history to their classmates, each ending with a powerful refrain: we are still here"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

One dozen kids discuss the historical and contemporary laws, policies, movements and victories that have shaped Native American culture of the past and present, from forced assimilation and tribe nation delegitimization to language revival efforts and the Indian Child Welfare Act. Simultaneous eBook. Illustrations.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A 2022 American Indian Youth Literature Picture Book Honor BookA 2022 Robert F. Sibert Honor BookTwelve Native American kids present historical and contemporary laws, policies, struggles, and victories in Native life, each with a powerful refrain: We are still here!Too often, Native American history is treated as a finished chapter instead of relevant and ongoing. This companion book to the award-winning We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga offers readers everything they never learned in school about Native American people's past, present, and future. Precise, lyrical writing presents topics including: forced assimilation (such as boarding schools), land allotment and Native tribal reorganization, termination (the US government not recognizing tribes as nations), Native urban relocation (from reservations), self-determination (tribal self-empowerment), Native civil rights, the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), religious freedom, economic development (including casino development), Native language revival efforts, cultural persistence, and nationhood.