This place 150 years retold

hoopla digital

eBook - 2019

Explore the past 150 years through the eyes of Indigenous creators in this groundbreaking graphic novel anthology. Beautifully illustrated, these stories are an emotional and enlightening journey through Indigenous wonderworks, psychic battles, and time travel. See how Indigenous peoples have survived a post-apocalyptic world since Contact. This is one of the 200 exceptional projects funded through the Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter initiative. With this $35M initiative, the Counc...il supports the creation and sharing of the arts in communities across Canada.

Saved in:
Subjects
Genres
Electronic books
Graphic novels
Comic books, strips, etc
Online Access
Instantly available on hoopla.
Cover image
Published
[United States] : Portage & Main Press 2019.
Language
English
Physical Description
1 online resource
Format
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Audience
Rated T
ISBN
9781553797838
1553797833
Access
AVAILABLE FOR USE ONLY BY IOWA CITY AND RESIDENTS OF THE CONTRACTING GOVERNMENTS OF JOHNSON COUNTY, UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, HILLS, AND LONE TREE (IA).
Corporate Author
hoopla digital (-)
Other Authors
Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm, 1965- (author), Sonny Assu, 1975- (-), Brandon Mitchell (colourist), Rachel Qitsualik-Tinsley, 1953- (writer of foreword), Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley, 1969- (illustrator), David Robertson, 1977-, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, Jen Storm, 1986-, Richard Van Camp, author, Katherena Vermette, 1977-, Chelsea Vowel, Donovan Yaciuk, 1975-, Alicia Elliott, Tara Audibert, 1975-, Kyle Charles, Natasha Donovan, Scott A. Ford, 1991-, Scott B. Henderson, Ryan Howe, Andrew Lodwick, 1980-
Review by Booklist Reviews

This collection of 10 stories retells Canada's history since Confederacy in 1867 through the lens of its Indigenous peoples. Each story focuses on a significant Indigenous historical figure or event, illuminating pivotal moments with a focus on Indigenous rights and sovereignty. Eleven Indigenous authors and eight illustrators from various cultures make for a wide range of storytelling and illustrative styles, although author introductions and timelines for each piece establish some continuity. The fact-based stories relay important historical figures and pivotal moments for Indigenous rights in an accessible way, but the more fantastical stories are where this collection really shines. "Red Clouds," a fictionalized account of a woman murdered during a great famine, conveys a disturbingly eerie and convincing alternate explanation of events, while "Rosie" offers a surreal, dreamlike landscape in which Inuit shamanism and European colonialism collide, illuminating the vast chasm between the two cultures. Although somewhat uneven, this collection provides invaluable opportunity to hear voices that are featured all too rarely in literature and is a worthwhile addition to collections. Grades 9-12. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Ten tales offer an enlightening perspective of Canadian history from the point of view of First Nations people. Preceded with timelines to place them in historical context, each explores survival strategies adopted by indigenous people after the arrival of Europeans in North America. "We have survived the apocalypse," Alicia Elliot writes in the foreword. "Annie of Red River" by Katherena Vermette and Scott B. Henderson, set in 1850, features a prominent Native woman who takes physical action against a journalist who insulted Métis women. "Red Clouds" and "Peggy," illustrated in earthy tones by Natasha Donovan, are especially vivid in their depictions of peril —first in the form of windigo (a supernatural being in traditional First Nations folklore) and then in WWI. Both recount historical events with sensitivity to shamanistic beliefs. As the stories move further into the 20th century, and First Nations people grapple with their children being forced into foster care and their land being appropriated for industry, the art becomes grounded in a more pedestrian style, shifting from the mystical visions of earlier pieces. The final story, "Kitaskînaw 2350,"by Chelsea Vowell, imagines a future Canada and strikes a heavily didactic note, pulling down the collection. Still, the anthology's theme and authentically told stories make it a stand-out. (May) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 9 Up—Ten stories. Ten stunning Indigenous insights into 150 years of Canadian history, leavened with a dash of hope for the future, written and drawn in defiance of the attempted erassure of Indigenous peoples from Canadian identity and history. Each piece is introduced by a foreword from its author, with a time line of events surrounding the narrative, adding to readers' appreciation. Ten different art styles bring to life tales of separation, personal sacrifice, and resistance, of spiritualism and wonder, of promises broken, and of voices finally heard. Some of the artwork is in full color with large page spreads and vibrant hues and detail. One selection is rendered in dreamy watercolors; others are presented in black-and-white, with strong stark contrasts or sketchlike elements. All are powerful and poignant. Expressive and well rendered, the characters stand out and will linger with readers. In every case, the art and writing are a perfect fit; panels are creatively spaced, the pacing superb, and the speech bubbles well placed. VERDICT An essential title with first-rate storytelling and beautiful use of color and design.—Kelley Gile, Cheshire Public Library, CT Copyright 2019 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A graphic novel anthology depicts the last one hundred fifty years of Canadian history as seen through the eyes of the Indigenous peoples who inhabited the land before the Europeans arrived.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Explore the past 150 years through the eyes of Indigenous creators in this groundbreaking graphic novel anthology. Beautifully illustrated, these stories are an emotional and enlightening journey through Indigenous wonderworks, psychic battles, and time travel. See how Indigenous peoples have survived a post-apocalyptic world since Contact.Each story includes a timeline of related historical events and a personal note from the author. Find cited sources and a select bibliography for further reading in the back of the book. The accompanying teacher guide includes  curriculum charts and 12 lesson plans  to help educators use the book with their students.This is one of the 200 exceptional projects funded through the Canada Council for the Arts’ New Chapter initiative. With this $35M initiative, the Council supports the creation and sharing of the arts in communities across Canada. 

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Explore the past 150 years through the eyes of Indigenous creators in this groundbreaking graphic novel anthology. Beautifully illustrated, these stories are an emotional and enlightening journey through Indigenous wonderworks, psychic battles, and time travel. See how Indigenous peoples have survived a post-apocalyptic world since Contact.