The approaching storm Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and their clash over America's future

Neil Lanctot, 1966-

Book - 2021

In the early years of the 20th century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams. The three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age. Following the outset of World War I in 1914, their views splintered as they could not agree on how America should respond to what soon proved to be an unprecedented global catastrophe. ...Lanctot tells how they debated, quarreled, and split over the role the United States should play in the world. Their clash became an important story of how and why the United States emerged onto the world stage. -- adapted from jacket

Saved in:

2nd Floor New Shelf Show me where

973.913/Lanctot
0 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor New Shelf 973.913/Lanctot (NEW SHELF) Due Oct 20, 2022
Subjects
Published
New York : Riverhead Books 2021.
Language
English
Physical Description
657 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages [593]-642) and index.
ISBN
9780735210592
0735210594
Main Author
Neil Lanctot, 1966- (author)
  • Prologue: The rough rider, the reformer, and the scholar
  • A more complicated world
  • A war with which we have nothing to do
  • A strict accountability
  • A disgrace to the women of America
  • Too proud to fight
  • "I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier"
  • A second crisis
  • Preparedness U.S.A.
  • Out of the trenches by Christmas
  • A world on fire
  • A test of strength
  • Teetering on the abyss
  • Last stand of the Bull Moose
  • Summer of anxiety
  • An election and a peace move
  • Peace in sight
  • The final battle
  • Epilogue
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* As the world began its march to the outbreak of WWI, the U.S. found itself conflicted domestically as well as diplomatically. Lanctot (Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella, 2011) recounts this momentous time by focusing on three Americans whose status and leadership profoundly influenced how the nation would respond to Europe's crisis. Theodore Roosevelt had sundered the Republican Party with his breakaway Progressive Party campaign for the 1912 Presidential election. Woodrow Wilson, scholar and visionary, won that election and had to navigate the almost-impossible territory among rival nations, bypassing formal State Department channels by deploying Colonel Edward House to Europe. Jane Addams had become one of the world's most respected personalities, and her intense pacifism attracted many Americans as well as foreigners eager to manipulate American opinion. Lanctot shifts smoothly among these pivotal personalities and makes the details of this broadly ranging history accessible to all sorts of readers. He covers some of the same territory Barbara Tuchman explored in her iconic The Guns of August, but Lanctot's focus on the roles of these three titanic figures contributes a unique and valuable view of America's place in the Great War's genesis. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

In this latest book, award-winning historian Lanctot (Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella) focuses on the responses of three iconic figures in progressivism to the United States' burgeoning global position, specifically its involvement in the Great War. Born within a few years of each other, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams, illustrating varying forms of internationalism, fearlessly took conflicting stances on the Great War while combatting their own physical challenges. Lanctot makes abundant use of primary sources, most of them already well-mined by historians, except for the papers of James Norman Hall (an American aviator who served in World War I and later escaped to Tahiti, where he co-authored the "Mutiny on the Bounty" trilogy). In this thought-provoking narrative, Lanctot saves speculation until the end, where he conjectures that if Wilson had made different decisions during his presidency, a longer and less conclusive conflict might have beneficially resulted in a sustainable global power equilibrium. VERDICT Lanctot offers a well-written presentation on a familiar topic, which general readers might compare to Justus Doenecke's Nothing Less Than War and G.J. Meyer's The World Remade.—Frederick J. Augustyn Jr., Lib. of Congress, Washington, DC Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

In this latest book, award-winning historian Lanctot (Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella) focuses on the responses of three iconic figures in progressivism to the United States' burgeoning global position, specifically its involvement in the Great War. Born within a few years of each other, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams, illustrating varying forms of internationalism, fearlessly took conflicting stances on the Great War while combatting their own physical challenges. Lanctot makes abundant use of primary sources, most of them already well-mined by historians, except for the papers of James Norman Hall (an American aviator who served in World War I and later escaped to Tahiti, where he co-authored the "Mutiny on the Bounty" trilogy). In this thought-provoking narrative, Lanctot saves speculation until the end, where he conjectures that if Wilson had made different decisions during his presidency, a longer and less conclusive conflict might have beneficially resulted in a sustainable global power equilibrium. VERDICT Lanctot offers a well-written presentation on a familiar topic, which general readers might compare to Justus Doenecke's Nothing Less Than War and G.J. Meyer's The World Remade.—Frederick J. Augustyn Jr., Lib. of Congress, Washington, DC Copyright 2021 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Historian Lanctot (Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campenella) delivers a fresh, character-driven look at the debate over America's entry into WWI. He focuses on three "giants" of the Progressive Era, each of whom advocated a different course of action. Recognizing that most Americans didn't want to get involved in European wars, President Woodrow Wilson established an official policy of neutrality in August 1914. Jane Addams, who enjoyed near-universal admiration for her innovative social welfare programs, promoted pacifism and organized an international peace conference in The Hague in April 1915. The following month, a German submarine sank the passenger ship Lusitania, killing 128 Americans. Support grew for the military preparedness advocated by former president Theodore Roosevelt, whose comeback bid (as nominee of the Progressive Party) against Wilson in the 1912 election had fallen short. After winning reelection in 1916, Wilson tried and failed to broker a peace deal, and finally asked Congress for a war declaration in April 1917. Lanctot smoothly toggles between his three main subjects and intriguing secondary characters including Hungarian suffragist and pacifist Rosika Schwimmer and American novelist James Norman Hall, who volunteered to fight with the British. The result is a rich and rewarding portrait of a crucial turning point in American history. (Oct.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"By turns a colorful triptych of three American icons who changed history and the engrossing story of the roots of World War I, The Approaching Storm is a surprising and important story of how and why the United States emerged onto the world stage"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Presents the true story of three extraordinary leaders—Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson and social reformer Jane Addams—and how they agreed, argued and ultimately split apart as they debated the role that the United States should play in World War I.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Winner of the 2022 award for biography from the American Society of Journalists and AuthorsThe fascinating story of how the three most influential American progressives of the early twentieth century split over America’s response to World War I.In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age. Following the outset of World War I in 1914, the views of these three titans splintered as they could not agree on how America should respond to what soon proved to be an unprecedented global catastrophe. The Approaching Storm is the story of three extraordinary leaders and how they debated, quarreled, and split over the role the United States should play in the world.   By turns a colorful triptych of three American icons who changed history and the engrossing story of the roots of World War I, The Approaching Storm is a surprising and important story of how and why the United States emerged onto the world stage.