The good death

S. D. Sykes

Book - 2021

"In 1349, Oswald, the third son of the de Lacy family, was an eighteen-year-old novice monk at Kintham Abbey. Sent to collect herbs from the forest, Oswald comes across a terrified village girl. Frenzied with fear, she runs headlong into a swollen river. Oswald pulls her broken and bruised body from the water and returns her to the local village, only to discover that several other women have disappeared. A heinous killer is at work, but because all of the missing women come from impoverish...ed families without influence, nobody seems to care. Oswald vows to find this killer himself--but as plague approaches, his beloved tutor Brother Peter insists they must stay inside the monastery. He turns instead to the women of the village for help, and particularly the enigmatic and beautiful Maud Woodstock--a woman who provokes strong emotions in Oswald. As he closes in on the killer, Oswald makes a discovery that is so utterly shocking that it threatens to destroy him and his family. Even as plague rages across England and death is at every door, Oswald must kill or be killed. And the discovery will be a secret that haunts him for the rest of his life."--Amazon.

Saved in:

1st Floor Show me where

MYSTERY/Sykes, S. D.
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
1st Floor MYSTERY/Sykes, S. D. Checked In
Series
Sykes, S. D. Somershill Manor mystery ; 5.
Subjects
Genres
Historical fiction
Detective and mystery fiction
Published
New York, NY : Pegasus Crime, an imprint of Pegasus Books, Ltd 2021.
Edition
First Pegasus Books hardcover edition
Language
English
Physical Description
295 pages ; 25 cm
ISBN
1643137794
9781643137797
Main Author
S. D. Sykes (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

The fifth in the Somershill Manor mysteries, which follow the investigations of a Kentish lord in the mid-fourteenth century, centers on one young girl's death and the disappearances and possible murders of five other girls from the same poverty-stricken village. This mystery is a deathbed confession—in 1360, a guilt-ridden Lord Oswald de Lacey tells his dying mother about what he did as a probationary monk in 1349. The 18-year-old Oswald, then a novice monk (his father's and brothers' deaths soon made him Lord Oswald), decided on his own to investigate the girls' disappearances, ignoring his superiors' orders and the threat of the Black Death, which had just reached England the year before. While the medieval and monastic background is absorbing, it's a bit of a stretch to believe that the novice monk could actually do so much sleuthing on his own. Recommended for fans of the series, who may also want to check out Ellis Peters' Brother Cadfael mysteries, set in twelfth-century England and also starring a very canny monk. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

The fifth in the Somershill Manor mysteries, which follow the investigations of a Kentish lord in the mid-fourteenth century, centers on one young girl's death and the disappearances and possible murders of five other girls from the same poverty-stricken village. This mystery is a deathbed confession—in 1360, a guilt-ridden Lord Oswald de Lacey tells his dying mother about what he did as a probationary monk in 1349. The 18-year-old Oswald, then a novice monk (his father's and brothers' deaths soon made him Lord Oswald), decided on his own to investigate the girls' disappearances, ignoring his superiors' orders and the threat of the Black Death, which had just reached England the year before. While the medieval and monastic background is absorbing, it's a bit of a stretch to believe that the novice monk could actually do so much sleuthing on his own. Recommended for fans of the series, who may also want to check out Ellis Peters' Brother Cadfael mysteries, set in twelfth-century England and also starring a very canny monk. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

In Sykes's superior fifth mystery featuring Oswald de Lacy (after 2019's The Bone Fire), the action alternates between 1349, when the 18-year-old de Lacy was a novice at Kintham Abbey, and 1370, when de Lacy, now Lord Somershill, shares secrets from the past with his dying mother to get her forgiveness. At Kintham Abbey, while on an errand to collect herbs, he spots teenager Agnes Wheeler, who helps with the monastery's laundry, hiding in a bush. Agnes is terrified, and flees into a river, warning "Keep away from me, priest!" before the current sweeps her away, drowning her. When de Lacy retrieves the body, he finds marks of violence on it, including rope abrasions. Blaming himself for scaring Agnes into her fatal flight, he resolves to identify her assailant, who may have also been responsible for the disappearances of several other girls. That task becomes more complex after he learns the truth about Agnes's parentage. The framing device increases suspense, and the author's inventiveness and gift for description serves to deepen an already nuanced lead. Sykes solidifies her standing as a preeminent historical whodunit writer. Agent: Deborah Schneider, ICM Partners. (Sept.) Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"In 1349, Oswald, the third son of the de Lacy family, was an eighteen-year-old novice monk at Kintham Abbey. Sent to collect herbs from the forest, Oswald comes across a terrified village girl. Frenzied with fear, she runs headlong into a swollen river.Oswald pulls her broken and bruised body from the water and returns her to the local village, only to discover that several other women have disappeared. A heinous killer is at work, but because all of the missing women come from impoverished families without influence, nobody seems to care. Oswald vows to find this killer himself--but as plague approaches, his beloved tutor Brother Peter insists they must stay inside the monastery. He turns instead to the women of the village for help, and particularly the enigmatic and beautiful Maud Woodstock"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

In the new Somershill Manor mystery, Lord Oswald de Lacy makes a devastating confession to his dying mother. But will he gain the forgiveness he seeks, or destroy his family?England, November 1370. Oswald de Lacy, Lord of Somershill Manor, makes a devastating confession to his dying mother. But will he gain the forgiveness he seeks'or destroy his family?In 1349, Oswald, the third son of the de Lacy family, was an eighteen-year-old novice monk at Kintham Abbey. Sent to collect herbs from the forest, Oswald comes across a terrified village girl. Frenzied with fear, she runs headlong into a swollen river. Oswald pulls her broken and bruised body from the water and returns her to the local village, only to discover that several other women have disappeared. A heinous killer is at work, but because all of the missing women come from impoverished families without influence, nobody seems to care. Oswald vows to find this killer himself'but as plague approaches, his beloved tutor Brother Peter insists they must stay inside the monastery. He turns instead to the women of the village for help, and particularly the enigmatic and beautiful Maud Woodstock'a woman who provokes strong emotions in Oswald.As he closes in on the killer, Oswald makes a discovery that is so utterly shocking that it threatens to destroy him and his family. Even as plague rages across England and death is at every door, Oswald must kill or be killed. And the discovery will be a secret that haunts him for the rest of his life.