The storm before the calm America's discord, the coming crisis of the 2020s, and the triumph beyond

George Friedman

Book - 2020

"The master geopolitical forecaster and New York Times bestselling author of The Next 100 Years focuses on the United States, predicting how the 2020s will bring dramatic upheaval and reshaping of American government, foreign policy, economics, and culture"--

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Subjects
Published
New York : Doubleday [2020]
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Physical Description
xiii, 238 pages ; 25 cm
ISBN
9780385540490
0385540493
9780385543187
0385543182
Main Author
George Friedman (author)
  • The American regime and a restless nation
  • The land
  • a place called America
  • The American people
  • How America changes
  • How geopolitics frames the 2020s
  • The institutional cycles and war
  • The socio-economic cycle
  • First tremors of the coming storm
  • The crisis of the 2020s
  • a clashing of cycles
  • The 2020s crisis in technology and education
  • Beyond the storm
  • Conclusion: The American age.
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The vitriol of the Trump era masks crises in our economy and governing institutions that will deepen before resolving themselves, according to this probing and ultimately hopeful diagnosis of America's discontents. Friedman (The Next 100 Years), chairman of the forecasting organization Geopolitical Futures, argues that the country is ending the third installment of a recurring 80-year cycle of stress and reform in the federal government—the first ended when the Civil War established federal supremacy over states, the second when the New Deal and WWII cemented federal control over the economy; the third has been caused by a federal bureaucracy too "vast" and tangled to solve problems—and the turn of a 50-year economic cycle currently dominated by investor-friendly economics. These coinciding cycles, he contends, will cause upheaval in the 2020s before the 2030s stabilize around a new regime of efficient government and a fairer economy. Though Friedman's cycles feel artificial and his prophecies Nostradamian ("In 2024 a new president will emerge who represents the values of the declining era"), they frame cogent analyses of America's dysfunctions, including the demoralizing decline of middle-class incomes and working-class whites' resentment of an arrogant ruling technocracy formed by elite universities they can't get into. Crystal ball-gazing aside, Friedman offers a lucid, stimulating assessment of which way the wind is blowing. Agent: Jim Hornfischer, Hornfischer Literary Management.(Feb.) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The founder of Geopolitical Futures and best-selling author of The Next 100 Years analyzes historical cycles and current trends to predict a dramatic imminent reshaping in American government, foreign policy, economics and culture. Illustrations.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"The master geopolitical forecaster and New York Times bestselling author of The Next 100 Years focuses on the United States, predicting how the 2020s will bring dramatic upheaval and reshaping of American government, foreign policy, economics, and culture"--

Review by Publisher Summary 3

*One of Bloomberg's Best Books of the Year*The master geopolitical forecaster and New York Times bestselling author of The Next 100 Years focuses on the United States, predicting how the 2020s will bring dramatic upheaval and reshaping of American government, foreign policy, economics, and culture. In his riveting new book, noted forecaster and bestselling author George Friedman turns to the future of the United States. Examining the clear cycles through which the United States has developed, upheaved, matured, and solidified, Friedman breaks down the coming years and decades in thrilling detail.     American history must be viewed in cycles—particularly, an eighty-year "institutional cycle" that has defined us (there are three such examples—the Revolutionary War/founding, the Civil War, and World War II), and a fifty-year "socio-economic cycle" that has seen the formation of the industrial classes, baby boomers, and the middle classes. These two major cycles are both converging on the late 2020s—a time in which many of these foundations will change. The United States will have to endure upheaval and possible conflict, but also, ultimately, increased strength, stability, and power in the world.     Friedman's analysis is detailed and fascinating, and covers issues such as the size and scope of the federal government, the future of marriage and the social contract, shifts in corporate structures, and new cultural trends that will react to longer life expectancies. This new book is both provocative and entertaining.