The lives of Lucian Freud

William Feaver

Book - 2019

"Lucian Freud (1922-2011) is one of the most influential figurative painters of the 20th century. His paintings are in every major museum and many private collections here and abroad. William Feaver's daily calls from 1973 until Freud died in 2011, as well as interviews with family and friends were crucial sources for this book"--

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Subjects
Published
New York : Knopf 2019.
Edition
First American edition
Language
English
Item Description
"Originally published in Great Britain by Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, London, in 2019."
Physical Description
volumes cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9780525657521
0525657525
9780525657668
0525657665
Main Author
William Feaver (author)
  • [Volume 1]. The restless years, 1922-1968
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* Lucian Freud, one of the last century's most acclaimed realist portraitists, captivates both with his distinctive art and his unusual life. He was deeply private, yet he provided renowned British art critic Feaver unfettered access to his inner world. This, the first of two biographical volumes, is derived from their daily phone conversations held over several decades. Lucian was born in Berlin to Ernst Freud, Sigmund Freud's youngest son, and he and his family emigrated to London as Hitler ascended to power. Lucian was a defiant child who was uninterested in school, but he possessed a penchant for art nurtured by his mother. Once he came into his own, his circle included many contemporary luminaries, such as Dylan Thomas, Virginia Woolf, Francis Bacon, Frank Auerbach, and even the notoriously criminal Kray twins. Freud was married twice, and was an unapologetic serial philanderer. Despite acknowledging that he fathered over a dozen children, he maintained his distance from them. His proclivity for gambling left him in mounting debt, which he often paid with his art. Freud was adamant about not viewing his wild antics through a psychological lens, instead letting his art reveal existential truths. Feaver now delivers his own masterpiece, a highly intimate and multifaceted study of a fascinating and enigmatic artist. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Art, debauchery, nightlife, and lowlifes fill out this rollicking biography of the celebrated British painter. Art critic and curator Feaver (Frank Auerbach) follows Lucian Freud (1922–2011), grandson of psychologist Sigmund Freud, through his rise to the top of Britain's art scene, where his realist portraits thrummed with tension and suspicion, perhaps because of the marathon sittings his models endured or the pitiless depictions of flesh in his paintings. Feaver has much to say about the art— "Here are individual fingernails and individual hairs, some with split ends," he writes of the landmark Girl with Roses, "as fully realized as the golden tresses of a Dürer"—but more about Freud's daily picaresque: the relentless womanizing (he fathered 12 illegitimate children), the studied eccentricities (he carpeted his studio with broken glass), the gambling addiction that saddled him with debts to gangsters, and the swirl of colorful acquaintances, from nobility to famous artists to petty criminals, all of whom he painted. Feaver heavily quotes from his interviews with Freud, and the artist's chatty, insouciant voice—"I said, ‘I'm going to pay you when I've got the money and if you kill me you won't get the money,' an argument that impressed them"—suffuses the book. The result is a riotously entertaining narrative that immerses readers in Freud's beguiling sensibility. Photos.(Nov.) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Art, debauchery, nightlife, and lowlifes fill out this rollicking biography of the celebrated British painter. Art critic and curator Feaver (Frank Auerbach) follows Lucian Freud (1922–2011), grandson of psychologist Sigmund Freud, through his rise to the top of Britain's art scene, where his realist portraits thrummed with tension and suspicion, perhaps because of the marathon sittings his models endured or the pitiless depictions of flesh in his paintings. Feaver has much to say about the art— "Here are individual fingernails and individual hairs, some with split ends," he writes of the landmark Girl with Roses, "as fully realized as the golden tresses of a Dürer"—but more about Freud's daily picaresque: the relentless womanizing (he fathered 12 illegitimate children), the studied eccentricities (he carpeted his studio with broken glass), the gambling addiction that saddled him with debts to gangsters, and the swirl of colorful acquaintances, from nobility to famous artists to petty criminals, all of whom he painted. Feaver heavily quotes from his interviews with Freud, and the artist's chatty, insouciant voice—"I said, ‘I'm going to pay you when I've got the money and if you kill me you won't get the money,' an argument that impressed them"—suffuses the book. The result is a riotously entertaining narrative that immerses readers in Freud's beguiling sensibility. Photos.(Nov.) Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"Lucian Freud (1922-2011) is one of the most influential figurative painters of the 20th century. His paintings are in every major museum and many private collections here and abroad. William Feaver's daily calls from 1973 until Freud died in 2011, as well as interviews with family and friends were crucial sources for this book"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The first biography of the epic life of one of the most important, enigmatic and private artists of the 20th century. Drawn from almost 40 years of conversations with the artist, letters and papers, it is a major work written by a well-known British art critic. Lucian Freud (1922-2011) is one of the most influential figurative painters of the 20th century. His paintings are in every major museum and many private collections here and abroad. William Feaver's daily calls from 1973 until Freud died in 2011, as well as interviews with family and friends were crucial sources for this book. Freud had ferocious energy, worked day and night but his circle was broad including not just other well-known artists but writers, bluebloods, royals in England and Europe, drag queens, fashion models gamblers, bookies and gangsters like the Kray twins. Fierce, rebellious, charismatic, extremely guarded about his life, he was witty, mischievous and a womanizer.    This brilliantly researched book begins with the Freuds' life in Berlin, the rise of Hitler and the family's escape to London in 1933 when Lucian was 10. Sigmund Freud was his grandfather and Ernst, his father was an architect. In London in his twenties, his first solo show was in 1944 at the Lefevre Gallery. Around this time, Stephen Spender introduced him to Virginia Woolf; at night he was taking Pauline Tennant to the Gargoyle Club, owned by her father and frequented by Dylan Thomas; he was also meeting Sonia Orwell, Cecil Beaton, Auden, Patrick Leigh-Fermor and the Aly Khan, and his muse was a married femme fatale, 13 years older, Lorna Wishart. But it was Francis Bacon who would become his most important influence and the painters Frank Auerbach and David Hockney, close friends.    This is an extremely intimate, lively and rich portrait of the artist, full of gossip and stories recounted by Freud to Feaver about people, encounters, and work. Freud's art was his life—"my work is purely autobiographical"—and he usually painted only family, friends, lovers, children, though there were exceptions like the famous small portrait of the Queen. With his later portraits, the subjects were often nude, names were never given and sittings could take up to 16 months, each session lasting five hours but subjects were rarely bored as Freud was a great raconteur and mimic. This book is a major achievement, a tour de force that reveals the details of the life and innermost thoughts of the greatest portrait painter of our time. Volume I has 41 black and white integrated images, and 2 eight-page color inserts.