We return fighting World War I and the shaping of modern Black identity

National Museum of African American History and Culture (U.S.)

Book - 2019

"A richly illustrated commemoration of African Americans' roles in World War I highlighting how the wartime experience reshaped their lives and their communities after they returned home"--

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Subjects
Genres
Informational works
Published
Washington, DC : Smithsonian Books [2019]
Language
English
Item Description
Includes fold-out pages.
Physical Description
160 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 26 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 148-149) and index.
ISBN
9781588346728
1588346722
Corporate Author
National Museum of African American History and Culture (U.S.) (-)
Other Authors
Lonnie G. Bunch (author of introduction), Lisa M. (Lisa Mary) Budreau, 1957- (-), Philippe Étienne, 1955-
  • A global war
  • From civil war to world war : African American soldiers and the roots of the civil rights movement
  • At home and abroad : during and after the war
  • Epilogue: On the horizon : toward civil rights.
Review by Choice Reviews

Published by Smithsonian Books to complement an exhibit on WW I at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, this beautifully illustrated volume is organized in three main chapters interspersed with essays on specific topics. The three primary chapters provide a very broad overview of the causes of the war, trace the roots of the Civil Rights Movement to African Americans' wartime experiences, and describe life during and after the war. Seven shorter essays cover topics such as "Gold Star Mothers" and "The New Negro and Paris Noir." All content is presented in a highly readable style designed for the general public, with photographs and illustrations on almost every page. Especially commendable is the attention given to Black women, who are featured in many of the photographs and about half of the essays. The book includes a foldout timeline that spans several pages and a short bibliography to encourage further reading. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers and lower-division undergraduates.--D. Baldwin, Mississippi State University LibrariesDeeDee BaldwinMississippi State University Libraries DeeDee Baldwin Choice Reviews 58:04 December 2020 Copyright 2020 American Library Association.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"A richly illustrated commemoration of African Americans' roles in World War I highlighting how the wartime experience reshaped their lives and their communities after they returned home"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Commemorating the roles of African Americans in World War !, this book presents artifacts, medals and photographs alongside powerful essays that together highlight their efforts during the war, which laid the groundwork for later advances in the Civil Rights movement. Illustrations.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A richly illustrated commemoration of African Americans' roles in World War I highlighting how the wartime experience reshaped their lives and their communities after they returned home.This stunning book presents artifacts, medals, and photographs alongside powerful essays that together highlight the efforts of African Americans during World War I. As in many previous wars, black soldiers served the United States during the war, but they were assigned to segregated units and often relegated to labor and support duties rather than direct combat. Indeed this was the central paradox of the war: these men and women fought abroad to secure rights they did not yet have at home in the States. Black veterans' work during the conflict--and the respect they received from French allies but not their own US military--empowered them to return home and continue the fight for those rights. The book also presents the work of black citizens on the home front. Together their efforts laid the groundwork for later advances in the civil rights movement.We Return Fighting reminds readers not only of the central role of African American soldiers in the war that first made their country a world power. It also reveals the way the conflict shaped African American identity and lent fuel to their longstanding efforts to demand full civil rights and to stake their place in the country's cultural and political landscape.