Don't label me An incredible conversation for divided times

Irshad Manji

Book - 2019

"America's founding genius is diversity of thought. Which is why social justice activists won't win by labeling those who disagree with them. At a time when minorities are fast becoming the majority, a truly new America requires a new way to tribe out. Enter Irshad Manji and her dog, Lily. Raised to believe that dogs are evil, Manji overcame her fear of the "other" to adopt Lily. She got more than she bargained for. Defying her labels as an old, blind dog, Lily engages M...anji in a taboo-busting conversation about identity, power, and politics. They're feisty. They're funny. And in working through their challenges to one another, they reveal how to open the hearts of opponents for the sake of enduring progress. Readers who crave concrete tips will be delighted. Studded with insights from epigenetics and epistemology, layered with the lessons of Bruce Lee, Ben Franklin, and Audre Lorde, punctuated with stories about Manji's own experiences as a refugee from Africa, a Muslim immigrant to the U.S., and a professor of moral courage, Don't Label Me makes diversity great again."--Publisher description.

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Subjects
Published
New York : St. Martin's Press 2019.
Edition
First U.S. edition
Language
English
Item Description
Includes index.
Physical Description
xv, 302 pages ; 25 cm
ISBN
9781250157980
1250157986
Main Author
Irshad Manji (author)
  • Can we talk?
  • "Straight white male"
  • "Muslim refugee"
  • What change means
  • A new identity
  • Why (and how) to not be offended
  • Rethinking power and privilege
  • Rethinking multiculturalism
  • Rethinking courage
  • The lessons of Lily.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Labels are good things if one is searching for spices in a kitchen cabinet or looking for a T-shirt that fits. When it comes to people, however, labels can often provoke a journey that veers way off course from any original intentions. Manji is no stranger to labels. Born in Uganda, residing in Canada, Manji brings a fresh voice to the interpretation of Islam. She's an educator and philosopher, author and advocate, a Muslim and a lesbian. Pick one label, she might say, or, better yet, pick them all. In an era when all politics are both personal and global, labels are too quickly affixed to both include and exclude along religious, gender, political, and economic lines. Although Manji ponders such deeply divisive subjects as Black Lives Matter and homophobia through the slightly precious construct of talking to her deceased dog, Lily, it is nonetheless an apt device for the larger conversations she champions in the hope that society can evolve to bridge its divides and abandon its labels. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

A Muslim immigrant from Africa, author of the New York Times best-selling The Trouble with Islam Today, founder of the award-winning Moral Courage Project at the University of Southern California, and the first Chutzpah Award winner selected by Oprah Winfrey, Manji has the credentials to speak persuasively about how to launch a conversation with the "other" with whom one might disagree. Her imagined "other" in this book is an old dog named Lily, as she comes from a culture that demonizes the canines among us. Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Manji (The Trouble with Islam Today) urges tolerance and open-minded rapport via an imagined dialogue with her dog, Lily. The construct is unusual, but in practice it is basically the Socratic method: Lily asks questions and plays devil's advocate, providing counterarguments that allow Manji to respond to potential critics, the reader included. Starting with the premise that the recent resurgence of white nationalist sentiment is a symptom of backlash against movements in favor of diversity and multiculturalism, Manji argues that, rather than vilifying individuals who disagree with liberal ideas, progressives must set aside tribal differences and open a dialogue with conservatives and moderates (lest, the implication goes, they become radicalized by right-wing extremists). Manji illustrates her point with personal experiences, notably of her close relationship with Jim, an Obama-bashing Republican father figure, who happened to introduce her to her now-wife. She also provides a thought-provoking model of civil discourse in a story about a black woman and a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans learning from each other's views on the legacy of the Confederate flag. Manji's plea for unity is laudable and well-articulated. Those seeking a level-headed approach to reaching common ground will find Manji and Lily's conversation instructive. (Feb.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The founder of the Moral Courage Project, the first Oprah "Chutzpah" award winner and best-selling author of The Trouble With Islam Today incorporates epigenetics and epistemology insights into a unique conversation about diversity, bigotry and our common humanity.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

The founder of the Moral Courage Project and first Oprah "Chutzpah" award winner incorporates epigenetics and epistemology insights into a unique conversation about diversity, bigotry, and the common humanity of all people.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

"Don't Label Me should be labeled as genius. It's an amazing book." - Chris RockA unique conversation about diversity, bigotry, and our common humanity, by the New York Times bestselling author, Oprah “Chutzpah” award-winner, and founder of the Moral Courage Project In these United States, discord has hit emergency levels. Civility isn't the reason to repair our caustic chasms. Diversity is. Don't Label Me shows that America's founding genius is diversity of thought. Which is why social justice activists won't win by labeling those who disagree with them. At a time when minorities are fast becoming the majority, a truly new America requires a new way to tribe out.Enter Irshad Manji and her dog, Lily. Raised to believe that dogs are evil, Manji overcame her fear of the "other" to adopt Lily. She got more than she bargained for. Defying her labels as an old, blind dog, Lily engages Manji in a taboo-busting conversation about identity, power, and politics. They're feisty. They're funny. And in working through their challenges to one another, they reveal how to open the hearts of opponents for the sake of enduring progress. Readers who crave concrete tips will be delighted. Studded with insights from epigenetics and epistemology, layered with the lessons of Bruce Lee, Ben Franklin, and Audre Lorde, punctuated with stories about Manji's own experiences as a refugee from Africa, a Muslim immigrant to the U.S., and a professor of moral courage, Don't Label Me makes diversity great again.