The Jewish God question What Jewish thinkers have said about God, the Book, the People, and the Land

Andrew Pessin, 1962-

Book - 2018

"This book shares what a diverse array of Jewish thinkers have said about the interrelated questions of God, the Book, the Jewish people, and the Land of Israel. Accessible chapters present fascinating insights from ancient times to today, from Philo to Judith Plaskow. An intriguing and provocative book for readers wrestling with big questions"--

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

296.311/Pessin
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 296.311/Pessin Checked In
Subjects
Published
Lanham, Maryland : Rowman & Littlefield [2018]
Language
English
Physical Description
xxi, 262 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9781538110980
1538110989
Main Author
Andrew Pessin, 1962- (author)
Other Authors
Samuel Lebens (-)
  • Part I: Philo-Ibn Daud (c. 20 B.C.E.
  • 1180 C.E.)
  • Part II: Maimonides-Sforno (1135
  • c. 1550)
  • Part III: Spinoza-Pinsker (1632
  • 1891)
  • Part IV: Herzl-Lebens (1860
  • )
  • Afterword: Jewish philosophy: past, present, and future?
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Nearly a decade after his book The God Question: What Famous Thinkers from Plato to Dawkins Have Said About the Divine, Pessin, professor of philosophy at Connecticut College, reprises the format to succinctly trace, from Philo to Samuel Lebens, more than two millennia of diverse Jewish perspectives on theology. Of the 72 portraits in the book, one of the most striking is that of 12th-century historian Abraham Ibn Daud, who had surprisingly modern ideas on human freedom, moral responsibility, and living with the consequences of actions. The highlight of the book is the section covering Theodor Herzl's 19th-century argument for a Jewish state safe from anti-Semitism and its opposition by Shalom Dov Baer Schneersohn, who argued that religious Jews must reject Zionism because it seeks to force the hand of God. Also included are Hannah Arendt's dismantling of Eichmann's "radical evil" and Judith Plaskow's pivotal feminist midrash. This impressive summation of a huge wealth of material will be of interest to anyone interested in the history of Jewish thought. (Nov.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Nearly a decade after his book The God Question: What Famous Thinkers from Plato to Dawkins Have Said About the Divine, Pessin, professor of philosophy at Connecticut College, reprises the format to succinctly trace, from Philo to Samuel Lebens, more than two millennia of diverse Jewish perspectives on theology. Of the 72 portraits in the book, one of the most striking is that of 12th-century historian Abraham Ibn Daud, who had surprisingly modern ideas on human freedom, moral responsibility, and living with the consequences of actions. The highlight of the book is the section covering Theodor Herzl's 19th-century argument for a Jewish state safe from anti-Semitism and its opposition by Shalom Dov Baer Schneersohn, who argued that religious Jews must reject Zionism because it seeks to force the hand of God. Also included are Hannah Arendt's dismantling of Eichmann's "radical evil" and Judith Plaskow's pivotal feminist midrash. This impressive summation of a huge wealth of material will be of interest to anyone interested in the history of Jewish thought. (Nov.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Nearly a decade after his book The God Question: What Famous Thinkers from Plato to Dawkins Have Said About the Divine, Pessin, professor of philosophy at Connecticut College, reprises the format to succinctly trace, from Philo to Samuel Lebens, more than two millennia of diverse Jewish perspectives on theology. Of the 72 portraits in the book, one of the most striking is that of 12th-century historian Abraham Ibn Daud, who had surprisingly modern ideas on human freedom, moral responsibility, and living with the consequences of actions. The highlight of the book is the section covering Theodor Herzl's 19th-century argument for a Jewish state safe from anti-Semitism and its opposition by Shalom Dov Baer Schneersohn, who argued that religious Jews must reject Zionism because it seeks to force the hand of God. Also included are Hannah Arendt's dismantling of Eichmann's "radical evil" and Judith Plaskow's pivotal feminist midrash. This impressive summation of a huge wealth of material will be of interest to anyone interested in the history of Jewish thought. (Nov.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"This book shares what a diverse array of Jewish thinkers have said about the interrelated questions of God, the Book, the Jewish people, and the Land of Israel. Accessible chapters present fascinating insights from ancient times to today, from Philo to Judith Plaskow. An intriguing and provocative book for readers wrestling with big questions"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

This book shares what a diverse array of Jewish thinkers have said about the interrelated questions of God, the Book, the Jewish people, and the Land of Israel. Accessible chapters present fascinating insights from ancient times to today, from Philo to Judith Plaskow. An intriguing and provocative book for readers wrestling with big questions.