Getting to us How great coaches make great teams

Seth Davis

Book - 2018

"What makes a coach great? How do great coaches turn a collection of individuals into a coherent 'us?' Seth Davis, one of the keenest minds in sports journalism, has been thinking about that question for twenty-five years. It's one of the things that drove him to write the definitive biography of college basketball's greatest coach, John Wooden, Wooden: A Coach's Life. But John Wooden coached a long time ago. The world has changed, and coaching has too, tremendously.... Seth Davis decided to embark on a proper investigation to get to the root of the matter. In Getting to Us, Davis probes and prods the best of the best from the landscape of active coaches of football and basketball, college and pro ... to get at the fundamental ingredients of greatness in the coaching sphere"--Publisher's description.

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

796.077/Davis
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 796.077/Davis Checked In
Subjects
Published
New York : Penguin Press 2018.
Language
English
Physical Description
294 pages ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-286) and index.
ISBN
9780735222724
073522272X
Main Author
Seth Davis (author)
  • Urban Meyer
  • Tom Izzo
  • Mike Krzyzewski
  • Jim Harbaugh
  • Jim Boeheim
  • Geno Auriemma
  • Doc Rivers
  • Brad Stevens
  • Dabo Swinney.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Davis wrote the New York Times best-seller Wooden: A Coach's Life (2014), and, as a longtime Sports Illustrated writer and studio host of CBS television's college basketball coverage, he has interacted with hundreds of coaches. Here he profiles nine of the best working today. They all have unique approaches to their profession, but the results are championship caliber. His subjects are Urban Meyer, Jim Harbaugh, and Dabo Swinney from football; Doc Rivers and Brad Stevens from professional basketball; Tom Izzo, Mike Krzyzewski, and Jim Boeheim from men's college basketball; and Geno Auriemma from women's college basketball. Particularly noteworthy is the chapter on Stevens, who improbably took underdog Butler University to the Final Four of the NCAA college tournament two years in a row and now coaches the Boston Celtics. Each of these profiles is a great example of long-form sports journalism, much like Davis did during his 22 years at Sports Illustrated. Fascinating reading. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Throughout his long career as a sportswriter with strong ties to Sports Illustrated and CBS Sports, Davis primarily has covered college basketball. Of the nine coaches profiled here, six head basketball, three lead football. Moreover, six are college coaches (Urban Meyer, Tom Izzo, Mike Krzyzewski, Jim Boeheim, Gino Auriemma, and Dabo Swinney), one a pro coach (Doc Rivers), and two (Jim Harbaugh and Brad Stevens) have done both. Harbaugh and Stevens are also the only ones without a championship ring. The theme of this book is that great coaches are able to create a team out of individuals. Davis views the coaches' work through a PEAK profile of essential characteristics: persistence, empathy, authenticity, and knowledge. Each chapter includes interviews with the selected coach, along with relatives, mentors, assistants, and former players as Davis relates the subject's life, career, and method. Although the coaches' styles vary from Harbaugh's in-your-face intensity to Boeheim's aloof practicality to Swinney's loquacious empathy, the nine essays fit together with what Davis views as the common keys to successful coaching. VERDICT Thoroughly researched and skillfully written, this book will draw an audience from fans of college sports mostly.—John Maxymuk, Rutgers Univ. Lib., Camden, NJ Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

Review by PW Annex Reviews

Davis (Wooden: A Coach's Life) gives readers an intimate insider's perspective on what it takes to succeed in high-stakes coaching positions. The answer, he believes, lies in the ability to convert disparate individuals on a team into a cohesive "Us" through what Davis calls a PEAK profile: persistence in tasks, empathy for players, authenticity in style, and knowledge of craft. Davis interviewed nine coaches (all men) who fit that profile, and devotes a concise chapter to each one. He takes readers into the coaches' personal lives; for example, Urban Meyer's anxiety and health issues forced him to temporarily retire as head coach of the University of Florida football team, but his "sabbatical taught him the importance of living a balanced life and conserving energy," and he later shared these lessons with his players. Many coaches brought knowledge from previous jobs or experiences: Clemson football coach Dabo Swinney credits his brief tenure as a commercial real estate developer with helping him understand how to oversee a large operation, while Michigan State basketball coach Tom Izzo learned the value of hard work and attention to detail as a kid tending the counter in his family's shoe repair shop. This refreshing look into the complex lives of coaches will appeal to an audience far wider than hardcore sports fans. (Mar.) Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly Annex.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The acclaimed sports commentator and author of the best-selling When March Went Mad presents a guide for coaching leadership that identifies the characteristics of exemplary coaches and how to implement the examples of such forefront individuals as Urban Meyer, Dabot Swinney and Brad Stevens.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Presents a guide for coaching leadership that identifies the characteristics of exemplary coaches, drawing on examples of active coaches from football and basketball to explore the fundamentals of greatness.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

"What makes a coach great? How do great coaches turn a collection of individuals into a coherent 'us?' Seth Davis, one of the keenest minds in sports journalism, has been thinking about that question for twenty-five years. It's one of the things that drove him to write the definitive biography of college basketball's greatest coach, John Wooden, Wooden: A Coach's Life. But John Wooden coached a long time ago. The world has changed, and coaching has too, tremendously. Seth Davis decided to embark on a proper investigation to get to the root of the matter. In Getting to Us, Davis probes and prods the best of the best from the landscape of active coaches of football and basketball, college and pro ... to get at the fundamental ingredients of greatness in the coaching sphere"--Publisher's description.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

What makes a coach great? How do great coaches turn a collection of individuals into a coherent “us”?  Seth Davis, one of the keenest minds in sports journalism, has been thinking about that question for twenty-five years. It’s one of the things that drove him to write the definitive biography of college basketball’s greatest coach, John Wooden, Wooden: A Coach’s Life. But John Wooden coached a long time ago. The world has changed, and coaching has too, tremendously. Seth Davis decided to embark on a proper investigation to get to the root of the matter.  In Getting to Us, Davis probes and prods the best of the best from the landscape of active coaches of football and basketball, college and pro—from Urban Meyer, Dabo Swinney, and Jim Harbaugh to Mike Krzyzewski, Tom Izzo, Jim Boeheim, Brad Stevens, Geno Auriemma, and Doc Rivers—to get at the fundamental ingredients of greatness in the coaching sphere. There’s no single right way, of course—part of the great value of this book is Davis’s distillation of what he has learned about different types of greatness in coaching, and what sort of leadership thrives in one kind of environment but not in others. Some coaches have thrived at the college level but not in the pros. Why? What’s the difference? Some coaches are stern taskmasters, others are warm and cuddly; some are brilliant strategists but less emotionally involved with their players, and with others it’s vice versa. In Getting to Us, we come to feel a deep connection with the most successful and iconic coaches in all of sports—big winners and big characters, whose stories offer much of enduring interest and value.