I feel you The surprising power of extreme empathy

Cris Beam

Book - 2018

"A cogent, gorgeous examination of empathy, illuminating the myths, the science, and the power behind this transformative emotion. Empathy has become a gaping fault line in American culture. Pioneering programs aim to infuse our legal and educational systems with more empathic thinking, even as pundits argue over whether we should bother empathizing with our political opposites at all. Meanwhile, we are inundated with the buzzily termed "empathic marketing"--Which may very well be... a contradiction in terms. In I Feel You, Cris Beam carves through the noise with a revelatory exploration of how we perform empathy, how it is learned, what it can do--indeed, what empathy is in the first place. She takes us to the labs where the neural networks of compassion are being mapped, and the classrooms where children are being trained to see others' views. Beam visits courtrooms and prisons, asking how empathy might transform our justice system. She travels to places wracked by oppression and genocide, where reconciliation seems impossible, to report on efforts to heal society's deepest wounds through human connection. And finally, she turns to how we, as individuals, can foster compassion for ourselves. Brimming with the sensitive and nuanced storytelling that has made Beam one of our most respected journalists, I Feel You is an eye-opening affirmation of empathy's potential"--

Saved in:

2nd Floor Show me where

152.41/Beam
1 / 1 copies available
Location Call Number   Status
2nd Floor 152.41/Beam Checked In
Subjects
Published
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2018.
Language
English
Physical Description
xviii, 251 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9780544558168
0544558162
Main Author
Cris Beam (author)
  • Part I. Understanding
  • The sound of science
  • Teach your children well
  • The experimental self
  • Ars empathia
  • Part II. Justice
  • Courting empathy
  • Empathy traffic
  • Performing empathy
  • Part III. Forgiveness
  • Fall from the tree
  • State of empathy
  • To interrupt power
  • Empathy for the enemy
  • Afterword: Love, a future.
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* It would be a mistake to assume there's nothing left to illuminate regarding the much-discussed topic of empathy, the defining phrase of the current American generation, according to Beam (To the End of June, 2013). Her exceptional intelligence, equally evident in her thinking and her writing, shines light on empathy from extraordinary angles. Unafraid to interrogate herself, Beam adopts both skeptical and supporting stances as she dives deep into empathy's historical roots and current iterations. In the "Justice" section of the book, Beam attends Human Trafficking Intervention Court, founded with the goal of shifting the lens—from criminal to victim—through which repeat offenders charged with prostitution are seen. Tens of thousands of American children are trafficked, and sending them to jail helps no one. Empathy is the worthy trigger for the shift. However, empathy fails when the helper's goal supersedes the actual person receiving empathy. Some who prostitute are not trafficked and do not want help leaving the trade. Empathy employed unwisely can resemble oppression. Beam opens with a section on understanding and closes with a challenging section on forgiveness. Her clear goal is to empower readers with the knowledge to enact the complicated and varied forms of empathy necessary to navigate modern times. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Beam (creative writing, New York Univ.; To the End of June: The Intimate Life of American Foster Care and Transparent) discusses empathy in depth in this latest offering. The author first defines the concept and then goes on to discuss its role in marketing today. She presents possible biological origins of putting oneself in another's shoes by documenting past lab experiments on monkeys and human CT scans and discusses psychological experiments that reveal how compassionate people tend to be in different situations. She also writes about visiting classes in which new methods are being used to teach the quality to children. In addition, she writes about empathy in the justice system and prisons, and explains how an increased amount of this attribute can help people reform. Finally, Truth and Reconciliation Commissions are introduced. These groups are trying to use feeling for one another to heal victims of oppression, specifically Native Americans in Maine, and family members of victims of apartheid in South Africa. VERDICT A lively and well-researched look at how humans experience empathy, and why we should all have more of it.—Terry Lamperski, Carnegie Lib. of Pittsburgh, PA Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

"A cogent, gorgeous examination of empathy, illuminating the myths, the science, and the power behind this transformative emotionEmpathy has become a gaping fault line in American culture. Pioneering programs aim to infuse our legal and educational systems with more empathic thinking, even as pundits argue over whether we should bother empathizing with our political opposites at all. Meanwhile, we are inundated with the buzzily termed "empathic marketing"--which may very well be a contradiction in terms. In I Feel You, Cris Beam carves through the noise with a revelatory exploration of how we perform empathy, how it is learned, what it can do--indeed, what empathy is in the first place. She takes us to the labs where the neural networks of compassion are being mapped, and the classrooms where children are being trained to see others' views. Beam visits courtrooms and prisons, asking how empathy might transform our justice system. She travels to places wracked by oppression and genocide, where reconciliation seems impossible, to report on efforts to heal society's deepest wounds through human connection. And finally, she turns to how we, as individuals, can foster compassion for ourselves. Brimming with the sensitive and nuanced storytelling that has made Beam one of our most respected journalists, I Feel You is an eye-opening affirmation of empathy's potential"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"A rigorously researched and intensely moving examination of empathy: how it works, how it transforms us, and how our society misunderstands it"--

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Sifts through ongoing debates and contradictory practices to present an examination of empathy and its related myths, science and power, revealing how empathy is learned, what is being discovered about its capabilities and how it has the potential to transform education, criminal justice, government and more. By the award-winning author of To the End of June. 35,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Presents an examination of empathy and its related myths, science, and power, revealing how empathy is learned, what is being discovered about its capabilities, and how it has the potential to transform education, criminal justice, and government.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

A cogent, gorgeous examination of empathy, illuminating the myths, the science, and the power behind this transformative emotion Empathy has become a gaping fault line in American culture. Pioneering programs aim to infuse our legal and educational systems with more empathic thinking, even as pundits argue over whether we should bother empathizing with our political opposites at all. Meanwhile, we are inundated with the buzzily termed “empathic marketing”—which may very well be a contradiction in terms. In I Feel You, Cris Beam carves through the noise with a revelatory exploration of how we perform empathy, how it is learned, what it can do—indeed, what empathy is in the first place. She takes us to the labs where the neural networks of compassion are being mapped, and the classrooms where children are being trained to see others’ views. Beam visits courtrooms and prisons, asking how empathy might transform our justice system. She travels to places wracked by oppression and genocide, where reconciliation seems impossible, to report on efforts to heal society’s deepest wounds through human connection. And finally, she turns to how we, as individuals, can foster compassion for ourselves. Brimming with the sensitive and nuanced storytelling that has made Beam one of our most respected journalists, I Feel You is an eye-opening affirmation of empathy’s potential.

Review by Publisher Summary 6

A cogent, gorgeous examination of empathy, illuminating the myths, the science, and the power behind this transformative emotion Empathy has become a gaping fault line in American culture. Pioneering programs aim to infuse our legal and educational systems with more empathic thinking, even as pundits argue over whether we should bother empathizing with our political opposites at all. Meanwhile, we are inundated with the buzzily termed 'empathic marketing''which may very well be a contradiction in terms. In I Feel You, Cris Beam carves through the noise with a revelatory exploration of how we perform empathy, how it is learned, what it can do'indeed, what empathy is in the first place. She takes us to the labs where the neural networks of compassion are being mapped, and the classrooms where children are being trained to see others' views. Beam visits courtrooms and prisons, asking how empathy might transform our justice system. She travels to places wracked by oppression and genocide, where reconciliation seems impossible, to report on efforts to heal society's deepest wounds through human connection. And finally, she turns to how we, as individuals, can foster compassion for ourselves. Brimming with the sensitive and nuanced storytelling that has made Beam one of our most respected journalists, I Feel You is an eye-opening affirmation of empathy's potential.

Review by Publisher Summary 7

A rigorously researched and intensely moving examination of empathy: how it works, how it transforms us, and how our society misunderstands it.

Review by Publisher Summary 8

A cogent, gorgeous examination of empathy, illuminating the myths, the science, and the power behind this transformative emotion Empathy has become a gaping fault line in American culture. Pioneering programs aim to infuse our legal and educational systems with more empathic thinking, even as pundits argue over whether we should bother empathizing with our political opposites at all. Meanwhile, we are inundated with the buzzily termed “empathic marketing”—which may very well be a contradiction in terms. In I Feel You, Cris Beam carves through the noise with a revelatory exploration of how we perform empathy, how it is learned, what it can do—indeed, what empathy is in the first place. She takes us to the labs where the neural networks of compassion are being mapped, and the classrooms where children are being trained to see others’ views. Beam visits courtrooms and prisons, asking how empathy might transform our justice system. She travels to places wracked by oppression and genocide, where reconciliation seems impossible, to report on efforts to heal society’s deepest wounds through human connection. And finally, she turns to how we, as individuals, can foster compassion for ourselves. Brimming with the sensitive and nuanced storytelling that has made Beam one of our most respected journalists, I Feel You is an eye-opening affirmation of empathy’s potential.