Hey black child

Useni Eugene Perkins

Book - 2017

"A lyrical, empowering poem that celebrates black children and seeks to inspire all young ones to dream big and achieve their goals"--

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jE/Perkins
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Subjects
Genres
Poetry
Picture books
Published
New York : LB Keys/Little, Brown and Company 2017.
Edition
First edition
Language
English
Item Description
This title is an adaptation of the poem previously published in Black Fairy and Other Plays, by Useni Eugene Perkins, in 1993.
Physical Description
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
ISBN
9780316360302
0316360309
Main Author
Useni Eugene Perkins (author)
Other Authors
Bryan Collier (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

The well-known poem "Hey Black Child" has been attributed to Maya Angelou and Countee Cullen, but in her author's note, Perkins describes the evolution of the piece she first wrote for a children's musical in 1975. The work is an empowering invitation to young African American children to, in some cases literally, reach for the stars. Collier's bold, effective watercolor-and-collage artwork mingles history with today's hopes and accomplishments. Pieces of an African past are represented, as well as the civil rights movement, but the emphasis is on the children of today. Kids stare brightly at the reader or look ahead to the future as they dance ballet, win trophies, paint pictures, or see themselves as astronauts. The text reminds them—and readers—that they are "strong / I mean really strong," and that learning and doing will help them bring about a nation that "will be what you want it to be." The punchy text and the invigorating art make this a wonderful choice for story hours or classroom discussion where children can voice their own dreams. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Perkins's 1975 poem, originally written as song lyrics (and sometimes misattributed to Countee Cullen or Maya Angelou), features compact, rhythmic language that's both avuncular and commandingly rhetorical ("Hey Black Child/ Do you know who you are/ Who you really are"). Collier (City Shapes) uses a combination of dense, burnished watercolors—the texture often mimics acrylics—and photo collage to imagine the possibilities open to empowered African-American children. Each stanza begins with a close, almost photorealistic portrait of a confident, happy child; subsequent pages show how the child's passion, coupled with a proud sense of heritage, leads him or her to become someone who helps make "your nation/ what you want it to be." A girl with eager, bespectacled eyes and a bright smile stands beside a telescope and knows she can become an astronaut; a boy inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement sees a future in politics. Perkins's poem has always made for a stirring recitation; new and old fans will find that Collier's images do full justice to it. Ages 4–8. Illustrator's agent: Marcia Wernick, Wernick & Pratt. (Nov.) Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Perkins's 1975 poem, originally written as song lyrics (and sometimes misattributed to Countee Cullen or Maya Angelou), features compact, rhythmic language that's both avuncular and commandingly rhetorical ("Hey Black Child/ Do you know who you are/ Who you really are"). Collier (City Shapes) uses a combination of dense, burnished watercolors—the texture often mimics acrylics—and photo collage to imagine the possibilities open to empowered African-American children. Each stanza begins with a close, almost photorealistic portrait of a confident, happy child; subsequent pages show how the child's passion, coupled with a proud sense of heritage, leads him or her to become someone who helps make "your nation/ what you want it to be." A girl with eager, bespectacled eyes and a bright smile stands beside a telescope and knows she can become an astronaut; a boy inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement sees a future in politics. Perkins's poem has always made for a stirring recitation; new and old fans will find that Collier's images do full justice to it. Ages 4–8. Illustrator's agent: Marcia Wernick, Wernick & Pratt. (Nov.) Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

The six-time Coretta Scott King Award winner and four-time Caldecott Honor recipient presents a celebration of the wonder and potential of black children, applying his signature evocative cultural imagery to Perkins' inspirational poem. 30,000 first printing. Simultaneous eBook.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

"A lyrical, empowering poem that celebrates black children and seeks to inspire all young ones to dream big and achieve their goals"--

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A lyrical poem with bright images celebrates African American children and encourages them to realize their dreams and achieve their goals.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

Six-time Coretta Scott King Award winner and four-time Caldecott Honor recipient Bryan Collier brings this classic, inspirational poem to life, written by poet Useni Eugene Perkins.Hey black child,Do you know who you are?Who really are?Do you know you can beWhat you want to beIf you try to beWhat you can be? This lyrical, empowering poem celebrates black children and seeks to inspire all young people to dream big and achieve their goals.