Death at Nuremberg

W. E. B. Griffin

Book - 2017

"When Jim Cronley hears he's just won the Legion of Merit, he figures there's another shoe to drop, and it's a big one: he's out as Chief, DCI-Europe. His new assignments, however, couldn't be bigger: to protect the U.S. chief prosecutor in the Nuremberg trials from a rumored Soviet NKGB kidnapping, and to hunt down and dismantle the infamous Odessa, an organization dedicated to helping Nazi war criminals escape to South America. It doesn't take long for the fi...rst attempt on his life, and then the second. NKGB or Odessa? Who can tell? The deeper he pushes, the more secrets tumble out: a scheme to swap Nazi gold for currency, a religious cult organized around Himmler himself, an NKGB agent who is actually working for the Mossad, a German cousin who turns out to be more malevolent than he appears -- and a distractingly attractive newspaperwoman who seems to be asking an awful lot of questions. Which one will turn out to be the most dangerous? Cronley wishes he knew."--Amazon.com.

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Location Call Number   Status
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Series
Griffin, W. E. B. Clandestine operations novel.
Subjects
Genres
Suspense fiction
Spy stories
Thrillers (Fiction)
Spy fiction
Published
New York : G.P. Putnam's Sons, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC [2017]
Language
English
Physical Description
436 pages ; 24 cm
ISBN
9780399176746
0399176748
Main Author
W. E. B. Griffin (author)
Other Authors
William E. (William Edmund) Butterworth (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

The fourth novel in the Clandestine Operations series continues to showcase that cloak-and-dagger period between the end of WWII and the establishment of the CIA. Jim Cronley is awarded the Legion of Merit, but winning that honor means he's lost his job as chief of the Europe station of the new intelligence organization. President Truman has other plans for Cronley, who is assigned to protect the head prosecutor of the U.S. delegation to the Nuremberg trials. The Russians have their own ideas, however, leaving Cronley to uncover the true motives driving the multiple players in this international espionage drama. Fans of this series, and of Griffin and Butterworth's military thrillers in general, will already know to expect both a dialogue-heavy narrative starring a savvy hero and a vivid evocation of a tumultuous period in world history. Beyond the established audience, however, this will appeal to all readers who savor historical fiction set in the immediate postwar era (Joseph Kanon's The Good German, 2001, for example). One minor caveat: starting at the first book in the series, Top Secret (2014), will guarantee maximum enjoyment. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

In this next in the authors' "Clandestine Operations" series, set at the dawning of the Cold War, Jim Cronley is shoved out as chief, DCI-Europe, in favor of a new assignment. He must keep the U.S. chief prosecutor at Nuremberg from being kidnapped by the Soviet NKVD while seeking out and destroying Odessa, an organization that helps Nazi war criminals escape to South America. Is this why he's nearly been killed twice? Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Set in 1946, bestseller Griffin and son Butterworth's flat, meandering fourth Clandestine Operations novel (after 2016's Curtain of Death) finds Capt. James D. Cronley Jr., chief of the Directorate of Central Intelligence in Europe, tasked by President Truman with beefing up security for Justice Bob Jackson, the chief prosecutor of the war crime trials in Nuremberg. "Loose Cannon" Cronley delegates the justice's protection to one of his officers and concentrates on capturing Franz von Dietelburg, the SS brigadeführer who heads Odessa, the postwar organization that's smuggling Nazis into Argentina. Cronley also investigates a Nazi cult established by Heinrich Himmler, the location of stolen Nazi gold, and a lot more. Numerous characters enter and exit for no apparent purpose other than to deliver lengthy history lectures. A handful of action scenes do little to interrupt the chinfest. Hopefully, the authors will strike a better balance between talk and action next time. Agent: Robert Youdelman, Rember & Curtis. (Dec.) Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Assigned to the Nuremberg war trials to protect the chief prosecutor from a rumored kidnapping, special agent James Cronley, Jr., finds himself fighting wars on multiple fronts as he also hunts down an organization that helps Nazi war criminals escape toSouth America.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Assigned to the Nuremberg war trials, special agent James Cronley, Jr., finds himself fighting wars on multiple fronts, in a dramatic entry in the popular series about the birth of the Central Intelligence Agency and the Cold War. By the author of Curtain of Death.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Assigned to the Nuremberg war trials, special agent James Cronley, Jr., finds himself fighting several wars at once, in the dramatic new Clandestine Operations novel about the birth of the Central Intelligence Agency and the Cold War. When Jim Cronley hears he's just won the Legion of Merit, he figures there's another shoe to drop, and it's a big one: he's out as Chief, DCI-Europe. His new assignments, however, couldn't be bigger: to protect the U.S. chief prosecutor in the Nuremberg trials from a rumored Soviet NKGB kidnapping, and to hunt down and dismantle the infamous Odessa, an organization dedicated to helping Nazi war criminals escape to South America.It doesn't take long for the first attempt on his life, and then the second. NKGB or Odessa? Who can tell? The deeper he pushes, the more secrets tumble out: a scheme to swap Nazi gold for currency, a religious cult organized around Himmler himself, an NKGB agent who is actually working for the Mossad, a German cousin who turns out to be more malevolent than he appears--and a distractingly attractive newspaperwoman who seems to be asking an awful lot of questions. Which one will turn out to be the most dangerous? Cronley wishes he knew.