The strange death of Europe Immigration, identity, Islam

Douglas Murray, 1979-

Book - 2017

This book is not only an analysis of demographic and political realities in Europe, but also an eyewitness account of a continent in self-destruct mode. It includes reporting from across the entire continent, from the places where migrants land to the places they end up, from the people who appear to welcome them in to the places which cannot accept them.

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2nd Floor 940.561/Murray Due Aug 30, 2022
Subjects
Published
London : Bloomsbury Continuum, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc 2017.
Language
English
Physical Description
343 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
1472942248
9781472942241
Main Author
Douglas Murray, 1979- (author)
  • The beginning
  • How we got hooked on immigration
  • The excuses we told ourselves
  • 'Welcome to Europe'
  • Multiculturalism
  • They are here
  • Prophets without honour
  • Early warning sirens
  • The tyranny of guilt
  • The pretense of repatriation
  • Learning to live with it
  • Tiredness
  • We're stuck with this
  • Controlling the backlash
  • The feeling that the story has run out
  • The end
  • What might have been
  • What will be.
Review by Choice Reviews

With smooth prose and the seductive feel of a nonfiction bestseller, this highly provocative book about the recent mass migration into Europe challenges multiculturalism. An intellectually astute conservative journalist, Murray asserts that recent large-scale migration has fundamentally and permanently changed Europe. He argues that the influx involves people who will not successfully integrate into European society or fully assimilate its values. Moreover, he believes the recipient countries' policy makers have not fully understood Europe's pull in contrast to the push from war and poverty, have failed to see the long-term effects of mercifully yielding in face-to-face contacts with migrants clearly in need, are blinded by multicultural-induced guilt, and lack the courage to defend liberal Europe's rule of law and protect fundamental individual rights, such those of women in certain cultures. The book's strength is its breaking of a fear-imposed silence on serious questioning of Europe's migration policies and their consequences, especially the development of parallel communities, the limits of tolerance in liberal societies, and Europe's going quiet on questions of non-liberal values and practices within some groups of migrants. The book's weaknesses include a lack of evidence supporting many key points, a propensity to engage in an us-versus-them mentality, and a logic of collective guilt in analyzing cultural groups. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty.--T. D. Lancaster, Emory UniversityThomas D. LancasterEmory University Thomas D. Lancaster Choice Reviews 55:04 December 2017 Copyright 2017 American Library Association.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

This book is not only an analysis of demographic and political realities in Europe, but also an eyewitness account of a continent in self-destruct mode. It includes reporting from across the entire continent, from the places where migrants land to the places they end up, from the people who appear to welcome them in to the places which cannot accept them.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

An examination of the continent's current socio-political climate takes the author from Paris to Greece to uncover the malaise at the heart of European culture and paint a picture of crisis.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A controversial and devastatingly honest depiction of the demise of Europe.The Strange Death of Europe is the internationally bestselling account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide. Douglas Murray takes a step back and explores the deeper issues behind the continent's possible demise, from an atmosphere of mass terror attacks and a global refugee crisis to the steady erosion of our freedoms. He addresses the disappointing failure of multiculturalism, Angela Merkel’s U-turn on migration, and the Western fixation on guilt. Murray travels to Berlin, Paris, Scandinavia, and Greece to uncover the malaise at the very heart of the European culture, and to hear the stories of those who have arrived in Europe from far away.Declining birth rates, mass immigration, and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive alteration as a society and an eventual end. This sharp and incisive book ends up with two visions for a new Europe--one hopeful, one pessimistic--which paint a picture of Europe in crisis and offer a choice as to what, if anything, we can do next. But perhaps Spengler was right: "civilizations like humans are born, briefly flourish, decay, and die."

Review by Publisher Summary 4

A controversial and devastatingly honest depiction of the demise of Europe