Voice of freedom Fannie Lou Hamer, spirit of the civil rights movement

DVD - 2016

Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson's interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats. Celebrates Fannie Lou Hamer's life and legacy with a message of hope, determination, an...d strength.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jDVD/Voice Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Nonfiction films
Children's films
Short films
Biographical films
Poetry
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Published
Holland, Ohio : Dreamscape Media, LLLC [2016]
Language
English
Item Description
"Read-a-long"--Container.
Title from title frames.
Based on the book Voice of freedom.
Special features: Author's note.
Physical Description
1 videodisc (34 min.) : DVD video, sound, color ; 4 3/4 in
Format
DVD; region 1, NTSC; widescreen presentation; Dolby digital, 2.0.
Audience
Ages 3 to 8.
Production Credits
Animated by Andy T. Jones ; edit and sound design by Andy T. Jones ; graphic design by Karen Warner.
ISBN
9781520016788
1520016786
Other Authors
Ryan Swenar (producer), Carole Boston Weatherford, 1956- (author), Ekua Holmes (illustrator), Janina Edwards (narrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* In this moving program, based on Carole Boston Weatherford's 2016 Caldecott Honor and 2016 Robert F. Sibert Honor Book, young viewers learn about the remarkable life of Fannie Lou Hamer, the youngest of 20 children born to Mississippi sharecropper parents, in 1917. Hamer's mother taught her to respect herself and learn to read, and at age six, the youngster began working with her family in the cotton fields. She married a sharecropper herself, and when she discovered that she could register to vote, she applied at city hall. An unfair voting test led her to join others, including members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, to fight for African American voting rights. Narrator Janina Edwards does a masterful job voicing Hamer, who refused to be intimidated by beatings, firings, and bigotry and was eventually honored for her advocacy. Singing a few lyrics of "This Little Light of Mine," Edwards embodies Hamer's triumphant spirit. Swirling animation adds a dreamy movement to Ekua Holmes' multimedia collages, which strikingly fit with the poetic language. The text doesn't back away from Hamer's many challenges and speaks about Jim Crow prejudice and relays difficult facts, including beatings and forced sterilization. Adding background music and Edwards' eloquent narration to the strong words make this a particularly powerful program. Includes a bonus author's note. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

*Starred Review* In this moving program, based on Carole Boston Weatherford's 2016 Caldecott Honor and 2016 Robert F. Sibert Honor Book, young viewers learn about the remarkable life of Fannie Lou Hamer, the youngest of 20 children born to Mississippi sharecropper parents, in 1917. Hamer's mother taught her to respect herself and learn to read, and at age six, the youngster began working with her family in the cotton fields. She married a sharecropper herself, and when she discovered that she could register to vote, she applied at city hall. An unfair voting test led her to join others, including members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, to fight for African American voting rights. Narrator Janina Edwards does a masterful job voicing Hamer, who refused to be intimidated by beatings, firings, and bigotry and was eventually honored for her advocacy. Singing a few lyrics of "This Little Light of Mine," Edwards embodies Hamer's triumphant spirit. Swirling animation adds a dreamy movement to Ekua Holmes' multimedia collages, which strikingly fit with the poetic language. The text doesn't back away from Hamer's many challenges and speaks about Jim Crow prejudice and relays difficult facts, including beatings and forced sterilization. Adding background music and Edwards' eloquent narration to the strong words make this a particularly powerful program. Includes a bonus author's note. Grades 4-7. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 4–8—This iconographic video expands on Carole Boston Weatherford's exemplary picture book biography of Fannie Lou Hamer by adding narration and simple animation. Janina Edwards's spirited narration conveys the beauty of Weatherford's poetic text and convincingly voices Hamer's perspective. Born in poverty, Hamer became a powerful voice of the civil rights movement. Forced to leave school after the sixth grade, she was in her forties when she first learned of her right to vote. Though registering to vote cost her work and drew death threats, Hamer was undaunted. With her signature song "This Little Light of Mine," she rallied others to register and worked tirelessly on behalf of the poor and disenfranchised. Throughout her life, Hamer faced hardships, which are described with candor and sensitivity. In 1963, after she and other civil rights workers sought service at a whites-only café, she was jailed and brutally beaten. Hamer refused to give up hope, though. Ekua Holmes's exquisite collage art depicts Hamer in yellow, symbolic of her Mississippi Delta roots and resilience. The presentation lingers over details in the mixed-media collages: sunflower motifs, snippets of text, and maps on clothes. Folksy guitar and simple animations enliven the presentation: hands clap, heads nod, and a pick-up truck rumbles into view. VERDICT This well-crafted video is an excellent resource to supplement American history studies, especially the civil rights era. Hamer's inspiring life story should resonate with a wide audience.—Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA. Copyright 2016 School Library Journal.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson’s interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats. Based on the critically acclaimed 2016 Caldecott and Sibert Honor Book, Voice of Freedom celebrates Fannie Lou Hamer’s life and legacy with a message of hope, determination, and strength.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Stirring poems and stunning illustrations combine in this acclaimed biography of Fannie Lou Hamer.