Encyclical on climate change and inequality On care for our common home

Francis, 1936-

Book - 2015

"In the "Encyclical on Climate Change and Inequality," the beloved Pope exhorts the world to combat environmental degradation and its impact on the poor. In a stirring, clarion call that is not merely aimed at Catholic readers but rather at a wide, lay audience, the Pope cites the overwhelming scientific evidence of climate change, and does not hesitate to detail how it is the result of a historic level of unequal distribution of wealth."--Provided by publisher.

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Subjects
Published
Brooklyn, NY : Melville House Publishing [2015]
Language
English
Italian
Physical Description
192 pages
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN
9781612195285
1612195288
Main Author
Francis, 1936- (author)
Corporate Author
Catholic Church. Pope (2013- : Francis) (-)
Review by Library Journal Reviews

"We human beings…need to change"—this blunt requirement typifies Pope Francis's astonishing encyclical on climate change. He effectively reframes global warming from an abstract, technical issue into a moral one, and gives the problem a new urgency—just in time for his U.S. visit this past September and the upcoming world climate summit in Paris. It's a short work, but the subject matter ranges widely to include a host of human-bred ills, e.g., degradation of the oceans, loss of biodiversity, deforestation, poverty, urban squalor, and rampant consumerism. There are some surprises: the problem of overpopulation receives relatively small attention, for instance, while our inner malaise, which the Pope calls "mental pollution," gets extra emphasis; the creed that unregulated markets provide the best solution to economic inequality is criticized, as are our Western individualistic attitudes. The encyclical "circles" around the idea of the interrelatedness of things—i.e., we harm nature, we harm ourselves (and especially the poor); the idea is implicit in Francis's proposal for adoption of an "integral ecology," one that encompasses environmental, social, and economic strands. VERDICT Straight talk on climate change from one of the world's most popular people may provide the necessary nudge to policymakers (and the rest of us). For this, the work deserves an enthusiastic imprimatur.—Robert Eagan, Windsor P.L., Ont. [Page 110]. (c) Copyright 2015 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Shares Pope Francis' letter on climate change and its impact on the poor, citing scientific evidence to argue that it is time for those in and outside the church to do something about it.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

This volume contains the letter Pope Francis wrote on climate change and its impact on the poor. He also addresses deforestation, the need for safe drinking water, population and abortion, public transportation, urban planning and architecture, social media, the genetic modification of crops, stem cell research, and law, economy, and governance, including deregulated markets, corruption, and weak governance. He emphasizes the interconnectedness and mutual responsibility people have towards each other, and how caring for the environment and each other are the same thing, drawing on the Bible and the concept of creation, and how aspects of modern life, particularly models of production and consumption, have led to current problems. He proposes an “integral ecology,” in which the world is based on respect for creation and interconnection. Annotation ©2015 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The complete text of Laudato Si’, the landmark encyclical letter from Pope Francis that, as Time magazine reported, “rocked the international community”In the Encyclical on Climate Change and Inequality, the beloved Pope exhorts the world to combat environmental degradation and its impact on the poor. In a stirring, clarion call that is not merely aimed at Catholic readers but rather at a wide, lay audience, the Pope cites the overwhelming scientific evidence of climate change, and does not hesitate to detail how it is the result of a historic level of unequal distribution of wealth.It is, in short, as the New York Times labeled it, “An urgent call to action . . . intended to persuade followers around the world to change their behavior, in hopes of protecting a fragile planet.” With an insightful and informative introduction by Harvard professor Naomi Oreskes, famed for her bestselling Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming.