Divorce is the worst

Anastasia Higginbotham

Book - 2015

""How can you not love a children's author who sees so clearly from her reader's point of view?"-Julie Bowen, actress, Modern Family"This book provides, through honest language and evocative imagery, a uniquely realistic view of how children experience divorce. While neither softening or white-washing this difficult topic, Higginbotham offers an ultimately comforting message to parents and children experiencing separation and divorce."-Lisa Spiegel, LMHC, Soho ...Parenting, NYCKids are told, "it's for the best"-and one day, it may be. But right now, divorce is the worst. With honesty and humor, Anastasia Higginbotham beautifully conveys the challenge of staying whole when your entire world, and the people in it, split apart. The first children's book to tackle divorce from a child-validating point of view, Divorce Is the Worst is an invaluable tool for families, therapeutic professionals, and divorce mediators struggling to address this common and complex experience.Divorce Is the Worst is the first book in a series of feminist children's books, Ordinary Terrible Things, which deals with common childhood crises and how children themselves find their own way to cope and grow.Anastasia Higginbotham is a writer and illustrator in Brooklyn, NY, whose childhood experience of divorce inspired this book"--

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Higginbo Checked In
Series
Ordinary terrible things
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York City : The Feminist Press at the City University of New York 2015.
Language
English
Physical Description
64 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm
ISBN
9781558618800
1558618805
Main Author
Anastasia Higginbotham (author)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

First in the Ordinary Terrible Things series, Higginbotham's debut children's book offers a frank look at the painful, confused emotions that are often a part of divorce. Set on the brown paper of bagged school lunches, the collaged artwork incorporates fabric scraps, torn photographs, and hand-lettered text as (largely unseen) parents tell their child that they are divorcing. "It can come as a surprise. When it does, it's the worst," writes Higginbotham as the child (whose gender is kept neutral) gasps. Higginbotham draws the child's features in ink, and readers follow a chain of emotions that includes shock, anger, sadness, and (short-lived) hope. "You're getting me a horse?" the child asks. "Um no," comes the response. "A divorce." The illustrations deliver a substantial emotional impact—a series of pages shows the child doing household chores while "reasons" like "We fell out of love" and "We've changed" appear on dirty dishes and thick gray carpeting. But it's Higginbotham's directness and refusal to talk down to her audience that will make this book such an asset to families negotiating divorce. Ages 4–8. (Apr.) [Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

K-Gr 3—This insightful and attractive picture book looks at divorce from a child's perspective. The title opens on a gender-neutral and ethnically ambiguous child being told by (unseen) parents that they're planning on splitting up. The child addresses readers directly about divorce while going about daily life (riding a bike, going to the bathroom). Higginbotham is honest with kids, acknowledging unpleasant truths, such as typical emotional responses (anger, guilt, sorrow) and what to expect from parents (crying, fighting, even offering kids bribes to soften the blow). She also places the burden directly on parents: "We don't decide our parents' lives. What they decide affects our lives." The beautiful collage illustrations (backgrounds look like ripped or wrinkled craft paper with photos and other images pasted on) and hand-lettered typeface give the book a homemade feel that will resonate with children. Higginbotham's decision not to portray the parents is a wise one: because readers never see a mother or a father, the title could be used for same-sex divorces, too. Appended are instructions aimed at helping kids express negative emotions by making a collage of their own. VERDICT While divorce books are plentiful, this one stands above the rest.—Brooke Newberry, La Crosse Public Library, WI [Page 134]. (c) Copyright 2015 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

""How can you not love a children's author who sees so clearly from her reader's point of view?"-Julie Bowen, actress, Modern Family"This book provides, through honest language and evocative imagery, a uniquely realistic view of how children experience divorce. While neither softening or white-washing this difficult topic, Higginbotham offers an ultimately comforting message to parents and children experiencing separation and divorce."-Lisa Spiegel, LMHC, Soho Parenting, NYCKids are told, "it's for the best"-and one day, it may be. But right now, divorce is the worst. With honesty and humor, Anastasia Higginbotham beautifully conveys the challenge of staying whole when your entire world, and the people in it, split apart. The first children's book to tackle divorce from a child-validating point of view, Divorce Is the Worst is an invaluable tool for families, therapeutic professionals, and divorce mediators struggling to address this common and complex experience.Divorce Is the Worst is the first book ina series of feminist children's books, Ordinary Terrible Things, which deals with common childhood crises and how children themselves find their own way to cope and grow.Anastasia Higginbotham is a writer and illustrator in Brooklyn, NY, whose childhood experience of divorce inspired this book"--

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Walks through the emotions and confusion it is common for young people to experience when their parents get a divorce, and describes some of the behavioral changes that may be observed in parents during this difficult time.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

"A lovingly crafted picture book speaking to the child's perspective on divorce. The book offers advice, sympathy, and wit to match without being pandering or authoritative. While admitting that divorces are painful, it above all empowers its young reader to cope with and even make the best of a difficult situation"--

Review by Publisher Summary 4

A refreshingly honest portrayal of divorce, this beautifully illustrated book offers children the hope of staying whole as parents split.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

Kids are told, "it's for the best"--and one day, it may be. But right now, divorce is the worst. With honesty and humor, Anastasia Higginbotham beautifully conveys the challenge of staying whole when your entire world, and the people in it, split apart. Exceptional in its child-centered portrayal, Divorce Is the Worst is an invaluable tool for families, therapeutic professionals, and divorce mediators struggling to address this common and complex experience.The Ordinary Terrible Things Series shows children who navigate trouble with their senses on alert and their souls intact. In these stories of common childhood crises, help may come from family, counselors, teachers, or dreams—but crucially, it's the children themselves who find their way to cope and grow.

Review by Publisher Summary 6

Kids are told, "it's for the best"--and one day, it may be. But right now, divorce is the worst. With honesty and humor, Anastasia Higginbotham beautifully conveys the challenge of staying whole when your entire world, and the people in it, split apart. Exceptional in its child-centered portrayal, Divorce Is the Worst is an invaluable tool for families, therapeutic professionals, and divorce mediators struggling to address this common and complex experience.The Ordinary Terrible Things Series shows children who navigate trouble with their senses on alert and their souls intact. In these stories of common childhood crises, help may come from family, counselors, teachers, or dreams—but crucially, it's the children themselves who find their way to cope and grow.