Weed the people The future of legal marijuana in America

Bruce Barcott, 1966-

Book - 2015

"Weed the People will take readers a half-step into the future. The issues surrounding the legalization of pot vary from the trivial to the profound. There are new questions of social etiquette: Is one expected to offer a neighborly toke? If so, how? Is it cool to bring cannabis to a Super Bowl party? Yea or nay on the zoning permit for a marijuana shop two doors down from the Safeway? Plus, there are the inevitable conversations between parents and children over exactly what this adult exp...eriment with marijuana means for them"--Amazon.

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Subjects
Published
New York, NY : Time Books [2015]
Language
English
Physical Description
x, 325 pages ; 24 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 321-322).
ISBN
9781618931405
1618931407
Main Author
Bruce Barcott, 1966- (author)
Review by Library Journal Reviews

The legalization (and ergo decriminalization) of marijuana use is one of the most dramatic and transformative social issues of our times. The recent legalization in Colorado and Washington State are only the latest manifestations of what has been a long history of legal regulation. What Barcott, a widely published nonfiction author and former Guggenheim fellow, brings to the table is a readable account of this history including some hilarious quotes from notables such as Richard Nixon. But the main emphasis of the book is a contemporary account of what the recent changes have wrought and what this changing world looks like. We get a glimpse into states where the penalties are still stiff for marijuana consumption and others where someone can walk in a store and simply buy an edible marijuana-laced gummi bear. The big questions still loom, however, as suggested by the subtitle. Barcott raises some fascinating topics but acknowledges that these are early days. Will the number of jurisdictions increase? How does the medical marijuana movement affect larger consumption subjects? VERDICT This fast-paced read contains great stories showing how these issues apply in everyday situations and will appeal to a broad range of readers.—David Azzolina, Univ. of Pennsylvania Libs., Philadelphia [Page 106]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Describes the events that took place between 2012 and 2014 which led to both Washington State and Colorado legalizing the growth, sale, purchase, and use of marijuana, and discusses what this shift means on a cultural, social, and financial level.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Describes the events that took place between November 2012 and November 2014 which led to both Washington State and Colorado legalizing the growth, sale, purchase and use of marijuana and discusses what this shift means on a cultural, social and financial level. 80,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

Marijuana, scientifically known as Cannabis sativa, thrived underground as the nation's most popular illegal drug. Now the tide has shifted: In 1996, California passed the nation's first medical marijuana law, which allowed patients to grow it and use itwith a doctor's permission. By 2010, twenty states and the District of Columbia had adopted medical pot laws. In 2012, Colorado and Washington state passed ballot measures legalizing marijuana for adults age 21 and older.The magnitude of the change in America's relationship to marijuana can't be measured in only economic or social terms: There are deeper shifts going on here -- cultural realignments, social adjustments, and financial adjustments. The place of marijuana in our lives is being rethought, reconsidered, and recalibrated. Four decades after Richard Nixon declared a War on Drugs, that long campaign has reached a point of exhaustion and failure. The issues surrounding the legalization of pot vary from the trivial to the profound. There are new questions of social etiquette: Is one expected to offer a neighborly toke? If so, how? Is it cool to bring cannabis to a Super Bowl party? Yea or nay on the zoning permit for a marijuana shop two doors down from the Safeway? Plus there are the inevitable conversations between parents and children over exactly what this adult experiment with marijuana means for them.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

The legalization of marijuana is the next great reversal of history. Perhaps the most demonized substance in America, scientifically known as Cannabis sativa, simply a very fast growing herb, thrived underground as the nation's most popular illegal drug. Now the tide has shifted: In 1996 California passed the nation's first medical marijuana law, which allowed patients to grow it and use it with a doctor's permission. By 2010, twenty states and the District of Columbia had adopted medical pot laws. In 2012 Colorado and Washington state passed ballot measures legalizing marijuana for adults age 21 and older.The magnitude of the change in America's relationship to marijuana can't be measured in only economic or social terms: There are deeper shifts going on here - cultural realignments, social adjustments, and financial adjustments. The place of marijuana in our lives is being rethought, reconsidered, and recalibrated. Four decades after Richard Nixon declared a War on Drugs, that long campaign has reached a point of exhaustion and failure. The era of its winding down as arrived. Weed the People will take readers a half-step into the future. The issues surrounding the legalization of pot vary from the trivial to the profound. There are new questions of social etiquette: Is one expected to offer a neighborly toke? If so, how? Is it cool to bring cannabis to a Super Bowl party? Yea or nay on the zoning permit for a marijuana shop two doors down from the Safeway? Plus, there are the inevitable conversations between parents and children over exactly what this adult experiment with marijuana means for them.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

The legalization of marijuana is the next great reversal of history. Perhaps the most demonized substance in America, scientifically known as Cannabis sativa, simply a very fast growing herb, thrived underground as the nation's most popular illegal drug. Now the tide has shifted: In 1996 California passed the nation's first medical marijuana law, which allowed patients to grow it and use it with a doctor's permission. By 2010, twenty states and the District of Columbia had adopted medical pot laws. In 2012 Colorado and Washington state passed ballot measures legalizing marijuana for adults age 21 and older. The magnitude of the change in America's relationship to marijuana can't be measured in only economic or social terms: There are deeper shifts going on here - cultural realignments, social adjustments, and financial adjustments. The place of marijuana in our lives is being rethought, reconsidered, and recalibrated. Four decades after Richard Nixon declared a War on Drugs, that long campaign has reached a point of exhaustion and failure. The era of its winding down as arrived. Weed the People will take readers a half-step into the future. The issues surrounding the legalization of pot vary from the trivial to the profound. There are new questions of social etiquette: Is one expected to offer a neighborly toke? If so, how? Is it cool to bring cannabis to a Super Bowl party? Yea or nay on the zoning permit for a marijuana shop two doors down from the Safeway? Plus, there are the inevitable conversations between parents and children over exactly what this adult experiment with marijuana means for them.