Surviving triple negative breast cancer Hope, treatment, and recovery

Patricia Prijatel, 1945-

Book - 2013

"After her diagnosis of hormone-negative breast cancer, health journalist Patricia Prijatel did what any reporter would do: start investigating the disease, how it occurs, how it's treated, and how to keep it from recurring. While she learned that important research on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) was emerging, she found a noticeable lack of resources on the disease, which differs from hormone-positive breast cancer in important ways, including prognosis and treatment options. ...Triple-negative breast cancer disproportionately affects younger women and African-American women-and some forms of it can be more dangerous than other types of breast cancer. But there are many reasons to be hopeful, as Prijatel shows in this book."--Amazon.

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Subjects
Published
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press c2013.
Language
English
Physical Description
xxi, 223 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
9780195387629
0195387627
Main Author
Patricia Prijatel, 1945- (-)
  • The sun shines on my bald head
  • What is this disease?
  • Understanding your diagnosis
  • The biology of triple-negative
  • Treatment: your options
  • The positives of healthy living
  • My life right now.
Review by Library Journal Reviews

Journalist and teacher at Drake University, IA, Prijatel (rhymes with Seattle) was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in 2006 at age 60, pretty much trumping the accepted thinking that this type of breast cancer—estrogen-receptor negative, progesterone-receptor negative, and negative for the Her2/neu human epidermal growth factor receptor—is a young woman's disease and also limiting her treatment to chemotherapy and radiation while eschewing hormone adjuvant therapy. Prijatel's journalistic skills are evident in her fluid prose and the detail with which she lays out the specifics of TNBC. Tables and shaded information boxes keep readers focused on the main points. Patients will learn about brachytherapy as an option over traditional radiation and the use of acupuncture to withstand the nausea brought on by chemotherapy. Prijatel also acknowledges the "blessing of this curse: you learn that you are loved." She states her goal here is to "inform, educate, calm, and encourage." She does so in fine form. Highly ­recommended. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Journalist and teacher at Drake University, IA, Prijatel (rhymes with Seattle) was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in 2006 at age 60, pretty much trumping the accepted thinking that this type of breast cancer—estrogen-receptor negative, progesterone-receptornegative,and negative for the Her2/neu human epidermal growth factor receptor—is a young woman's disease and also limiting her treatment to chemotherapy and radiation while eschewing hormone adjuvant therapy. Prijatel's journalistic skills are evident in her fluid prose and the detail with which she lays out the specifics of TNBC. Tables and shaded information boxes keep readers focused on the main points. Patients will learn about brachytherapy as an option over traditional radiation and the use of acupuncture to withstand the nausea brought on by chemotherapy. Prijatel also acknowledges the "blessing of this curse: you learn that you are loved." She states her goal here is to "inform, educate, calm, and encourage." She does so in fine form. Highly recommended. — "Breast Cancer" LJ Reviews 9/6/12 (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC)—estrogen-receptor negative, progesterone-receptor negative, and negative for the Her2/neu human epidermal growth factor receptor—is the triple whammy of cancer diagnoses. Journalist and TNBC survivor Prijatel here lays out the specifics of this rare form of the disease. Highly recommended. (LJ 9/1/12) [Page 137]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

After her diagnosis of hormone-negative breast cancer, health journalist Patricia Prijatel did what any reporter would do: start investigating the disease, how it occurs, how it's treated, and how to keep it from recurring. While she learned that important research on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) was emerging, she found a noticeable lack of resources on the disease, which differs from hormone-positive breast cancer in important ways, including prognosis and treatment options. Triple-negative breast cancer disproportionately affects younger women and African-American women-and some forms of it can be more dangerous than other types of breast cancer. But there are many reasons to be hopeful, as Prijatel shows in this book. Surviving Triple-Negative Breast Cancer delivers research-based information on the biology of TNBC; the role of genetics, family history, and race; how to navigate treatment options; understanding a pathology report; and a plethora of strategies to reduce the risk of recurrence, including diet and lifestyle changes. In clear, approachable language, Prijatel provides a fact-filled guide based on a vast array of scientific studies. Woven throughout the book are stories of women who have faced TNBC. These are mothers, wives, daughters, and sisters who went through a variety of medical treatments and then got on with life--one competes in triathlons, two had babies after being treated with chemo, one got remarried in her 50s, and one just celebrated the 30th birthday of the son she was nursing when she was diagnosed. Writing with honesty and humor, Prijatel delivers an inspiring message--that TNBC is a disease to take seriously, with proper and occasionally aggressive treatment, but it is not automatically a killer. Most women diagnosed with the disease survive and go on to live full lives. Surviving Triple-Negative Breast Cancer is a roadmap for women who want to be empowered through their treatment and recovery.