Little Red Hood

Marjolaine Leray

Book - 2011

In this retelling of the famous story, Little Red Hood questions the wolf's personal hygiene before tricking her predator into his demise.

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Location Call Number   Status
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Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
London : Phoenix Yard Books 2011.
Language
English
French
Item Description
Translation of: Petit chaperon rouge.
Physical Description
40 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 14 x 22 cm
ISBN
9781907912009
1907912002
Main Author
Marjolaine Leray (author)
Review by Booklist Reviews

The story of Little Red Riding Hood gets both an abridgment and tweak in this oddball offering. Per usual, the wolf snags Red and plans to eat her, except that he is delayed by her innocent questions. Many of these will be familiar, even though the grandmother character has been eliminated: "Gosh! What big ears you've got!" "And those are seriously big teeth." Maybe it sounds basic, but the magic here is all in the delivery. Short, wide pages display pencil artwork so rough it looks as if scratched upon a napkin, with the wolf a tall, spindly, scribble of lines, and Red little more than a triangle. This effect can be rather abstractly scary—those teeth really are big—though Red's lack of concern should transfer to the reader. The dialogue is unattributed but cleverly color-coded; the black sentences clearly belong to the wolf, the red ones to the little girl. It's a strong, minimalist package that finishes as only an import can: the sudden choking death of the wolf upon one of Red's offered candies. Copyright 2013 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

The macabre humor of this small-format retelling will likely divide readers: some will find it hilarious, while others will be shocked. French artist Leray draws the wolf and Little Red Hood with jagged strokes on blank white pages, alongside scrawled cursive text. The wolf, with a crazed stare and a snout as toothy as an alligator's, dispenses with the grandmother ruse—he just snatches the girl and takes her home. "Dinner is served!" he cries, standing her up on his table. Little Red Hood's tiny nose and red smudge of a cape convey cool composure. "You're ever so hairy," she tells the wolf, then doubles down: "You've got stinky breath." "I do?" he says, eyes wide. She offers him a candy ("Um... thanks"), he swallows it, then clutches his throat in agony as red poison spreads down his throat. A page turn, and he topples over dead, covered in red. "Fool!" she says. No brave hunter-rescuers for this Riding Hood, it's vigilante justice all the way. The fainthearted may recoil, but those who scorn sugarcoated endings will be delighted. Ages 5–up. (June) [Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publisher Summary 1

An edgy retelling of Little Red Riding Hood features a big bad wolf whose intelligence is virtually nonexistent and a savvy Little Red Hood who questions the would-be predator's personal hygiene before tricking him into his demise.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

An edgy retelling of Little Red Riding Hood features a big bad wolf whose intelligence is virtually nonexistent and a savvy Little Red Hood who questions the would-be predator's personal hygiene before tricking him into his demise.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

A minimal, edgy, and hugely entertaining retelling of the story of Little Red Riding Hood including a style of illustration that falls somewhere between graffiti and high art

Stylish and very funny, this book retells the famous story in an unexpected way. The wolf is still big and bad, but he also happens to be really, really dumb. Little Red Hood questions the wolf's personal hygiene before tricking her predator into his demise. This is one savvy little red hood.