The network Portrait conversations

Lincoln Schatz

Book - 2012

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Subjects
Published
Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Books c2012.
Language
English
Physical Description
223 p. : col. ill. ; 27 cm
ISBN
9781588343352
1588343359
Main Author
Lincoln Schatz (-)
Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

It's not easy being a Washingtonian; Congress's approval rating is at an all-time low and many Americans believe that our system is, if not totally broke, in need of some help. Schatz's book, a companion to an ongoing video portrait exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, is a pleasant and well-timed effort to burnish the image of the folks inside the Beltway. Familiar faces such as former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor are joined by people like anti-tax GOP operative Grover Norquist and Michael Kaiser, the president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The world of Washington, D.C. workersâ??lobbyists, secretaries, deputies, directors, elected officials, judges, chairpersons, and journalistsâ??is presented in an earnest, easy to read history-book style. The Chicago-based Schatz, an artist but not a journalist, spent about 45 minutes with each subject and the book showcases photo stills and edited first-person transcripts from those sessions. Based on the innocuous narratives, Schatz was not going for gotcha moments nor was he challenging his subjects. These rosy portraits may have limited appeal if you're a jaded insider, but for the average American adult or school child, they're chock full of worthwhile details and telling anecdotes. (Dec.) [Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

Review by PW Annex Reviews

It's not easy being a Washingtonian; Congress's approval rating is at an all-time low and many Americans believe that our system is, if not totally broke, in need of some help. Schatz's book, a companion to an ongoing video portrait exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, is a pleasant and well-timed effort to burnish the image of the folks inside the Beltway. Familiar faces such as former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor are joined by people like anti-tax GOP operative Grover Norquist and Michael Kaiser, the president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The world of Washington, D.C. workersâ??lobbyists, secretaries, deputies, directors, elected officials, judges, chairpersons, and journalistsâ??is presented in an earnest, easy to read history-book style. The Chicago-based Schatz, an artist but not a journalist, spent about 45 minutes with each subject and the book showcases photo stills and edited first-person transcripts from those sessions. Based on the innocuous narratives, Schatz was not going for gotcha moments nor was he challenging his subjects. These rosy portraits may have limited appeal if you're a jaded insider, but for the average American adult or school child, they're chock full of worthwhile details and telling anecdotes. (Dec.) [Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

Review by Publisher Summary 1

Drawing inspiration from Richard Avedon's 1976 photographic portfolio, The Family, the author, a contemporary American artist, presents generative video portraits of 100 influential figures who play pivotal roles in shaping the history and daily workings of America.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

As the nation grapples with some of the greatest developments and challenges to date, The Network presents a dynamic portrait of the people who help shape America's current technology, policy, and education. Drawing inspiration from Richard Avedon's 1976 photographic portfolio, The Family, The Network consists of generative video portraits of 100 entrepreneurs, industrialists, politicians, scientists, scholars, inventors, and other influential figures, some of whom may be household names and others who operate behind the scenes, who play pivotal roles shaping the history and daily workings of America. The project builds on aspects of portraitist Lincoln Schatz's earlier project, Esquire's Portrait of the 21st Century (National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution), taking a closer look at how the touchstones of America are created and preserved.