The hidden life of wolves

Jim Dutcher, 1943-

Book - 2013

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Subjects
Published
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic Society c 2013.
Language
English
Physical Description
215 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 19 x 26 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographic references.
ISBN
9781426210129
1426210124
Main Author
Jim Dutcher, 1943- (-)
Corporate Author
National Geographic Society (U.S.) (-)
Other Authors
Jamie Dutcher (-), James Manfull
Review by Publisher Summary 1

A photographic tribute to the authors' work as wolf caregivers and advocates documents their efforts with the Sawtooth Pack in Idaho and features a passionate argument for reintroducing and protecting wild wolves.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Published to complement a traveling exhibition being launched from Chicago's Field Museum, a photographic tribute to the authors' work as wolf caregivers and advocates documents their efforts with the Sawtooth Pack in Idaho and features a passionate argument for reintroducing and protecting wild wolves. Co-authored by the Emmy Award-winning creator of the film, Wolf: Return of a Legend.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

The authors, Jim and Jamie Dutcher, are wildlife photographers in Idaho at the edge of the Sawtooth Wilderness, where they have lived closely enough to a pack of wolves for long enough to be able to photograph their natural behavior in the wild. They are passible writers and great photographers, and touch in text on topics from the domestication of dogs to wolf reintroductions to the history of game management in the US. They spare no sympathy for conspiracy theories, strong feelings about state's rights, New Age beliefs, or political independence; they are interested in wolves, rather than wolves as a symbol for anything else. Since their primary role is as photographers, most of the book is wisely given over to the photographs, with short quotes about wolves by observers from Lewis and Clark to Barry Lopez. While the book's small size does not present the pictures at their most spectacular, the long format helps considerably, and the pictures themselves make a better case for wolves than any text can; the animals are often captured mid-behavior or in extreme close-up, neither threatening nor deferential to anyone but each other, spectacular and uninterested in humans. Royalties from the sale of the book will go to Living with Wolves, the Dutchers' nonprofit foundation for education about wolves and their role in the environment. Robert Redford contributes the introduction. Annotation ©2013 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Review by Publisher Summary 4

For conservationists and lovers of animals, nature, and especially dogs, this National Geographic book shares the surprising understanding of wild wolves gained over six years the authors spent living intimately with them. Delve into Jim and Jamie Dutcher's amazing wolf photography documenting a pack of wolves at the edge of Idaho's Sawtooth Wilderness, illuminating their complex social hierarchy. Here is the alpha pair, leaders of the pack, often the only couple that mate. Here are the pups, born with eyes shut in the spring, tousled by their mother through the first six weeks of life. Here is the omega wolf, lowest ranking wolf in the pack, whose subservience, often playful, alleviates pack tension. Here are moments of cooperation and moments of snarling dominance, moments of communication and affection. Here, too, are heartwarming moments of connection between the Dutchers and the wolves, caught in pictures that remind us how close the links are between wolves in the wild and the beloved family dog. Short chapters introduce the wolves as individuals, describe the Dutchers' years of coming to know them, and address the complex conservation issues surrounding the near-extinction and now replenishment of the species in the wild. Sidebars explore myths about wolves, including Native American spirit stories, European fairy tales, and modern ranching hearsay.

Review by Publisher Summary 5

For conservationists and lovers of animals, nature, and especially dogs, this National Geographic book shares the surprising understanding of wild wolves gained over six years the authors spent living intimately with them. Delve into Jim and Jamie Dutcher’s amazing wolf photography documenting a pack of wolves at the edge of Idaho's Sawtooth Wilderness, illuminating their complex social hierarchy. Here is the alpha pair, leaders of the pack, often the only couple that mate. Here are the pups, born with eyes shut in the spring, tousled by their mother through the first six weeks of life. Here is the omega wolf, lowest ranking wolf in the pack, whose subservience, often playful, alleviates pack tension. Here are moments of cooperation and moments of snarling dominance, moments of communication and affection. Here, too, are heartwarming moments of connection between the Dutchers and the wolves, caught in pictures that remind us how close the links are between wolves in the wild and the beloved family dog.  Short chapters introduce the wolves as individuals, describe the Dutchers' years of coming to know them, and address the complex conservation issues surrounding the near-extinction and now replenishment of the species in the wild. Sidebars explore myths about wolves, including Native American spirit stories, European fairy tales, and modern ranching hearsay.