El barrio

Deborah M. Newton Chocolate

Book - 2009

A young boy explores his vibrant Latino neighborhood, with its vegetable gardens instead of lawns, Nativity parades, quinceañera parties, and tejana and salsa music.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Chocolate Checked In
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York : Henry Holt 2009.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Item Description
"Christy Ottaviano Books."
Physical Description
unpaged : col. ill. ; 26 cm
ISBN
9780805074574
0805074570
Main Author
Deborah M. Newton Chocolate (-)
Other Authors
David Diaz (illustrator)
Review by Booklist Reviews

In first-person voice, a boy describes his home in the city: "This is el barrio! My home in the city with its rain-washed murals and sparkling graffiti." The simple text portrays street scenes, cultural celebrations, and people enjoying themselves on Cinco de Mayo, the Day of the Dead, and his sister s quinceañera. Thick lines surround the woodcut-like artwork imbued with a rainbow of glowing colors. Fascinating mixed-media collages (toy skulls, rocks, beads, shells) border each spread. The whole is an exuberant cacophony of colors and sights, useful in classrooms and multicultural settings for how it expands the often simplistic view of what makes up a barrio. A one-page glossary of Spanish words is included, and readers will enjoy practicing the correct phonetic pronounciations of words like iglesia, tejano, and churros. Copyright 2009 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Booklist Reviews

In first-person voice, a boy describes his home in the city: "This is el barrio! My home in the city with its rain-washed murals and sparkling graffiti." The simple text portrays street scenes, cultural celebrations, and people enjoying themselves on Cinco de Mayo, the Day of the Dead, and his sister s quinceañera. Thick lines surround the woodcut-like artwork imbued with a rainbow of glowing colors. Fascinating mixed-media collages (toy skulls, rocks, beads, shells) border each spread. The whole is an exuberant cacophony of colors and sights, useful in classrooms and multicultural settings for how it expands the often simplistic view of what makes up a barrio. A one-page glossary of Spanish words is included, and readers will enjoy practicing the correct phonetic pronounciations of words like iglesia, tejano, and churros. Copyright 2009 Booklist Reviews.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-Gr 2—A neighborhood that will ring true for many readers is introduced in this picture book. "This is el barrio!/My home in the city/with its rain-washed murals/and sparkling graffiti." The speaker goes on to list all the things that make the community what it is: Cinco de Mayo and Day of the Dead, quinceaeras and piatas, "Aztec eyes and Mayan faces." The poetic text and glowing illustrations praise a type of neighborhood that is often derogated or ignored: "silver-streaked tenements,/neon city streets,/storefront churches,/and bodegas that never sleep." Diaz returns to his classic thick-outlined woodcuts, but here the outlines change color through a rainbow of hues, making the spreads shimmer with color and movement. The framed spreads float over photographic collages that evoke the city—as in Eve Bunting's Smoky Night (Harcourt, 1994), but here, with more festivity. The book never goes far beyond its lists; a description of a quinceaera at the end attempts to link a narrative to the speaker, but is thin and almost unnecessary. Yet simply by calling upon these images as treasure ("syrupy sweet churros,/ice-cold paletas/and a lemon-yellow fire escape/as tall as a city skyscraper"), the book shows some young readers that their neighborhood, too, is both normal and special—and shows others what lies in the neighborhoods next to theirs.—Nina Lindsay, Oakland Public Library, CA [Page 107]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A young boy explores his vibrant Latino neighborhood, with its vegetable gardens instead of lawns, Nativity parades, quinceaänera parties, and tejana and salsa music.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

Join a young boy as he explores his vibrant neighborhood. The city shimmers with life--at once a party, a waltz, and a heartbeat. El Barrio is his sister preparing for herquinceañera, his grandfather singing about the past, and his cousins' stories from other lands. The city is alive with the rhythms of the street.Told in lyrical language and through bold, colorful illustrations, this celebration of Hispanic culture and urban life is sure to fire children's curiosity about where they live and what they can discover in their own neighborhoods.