One more year Stories

Sana Krasikov, 1979-

Book - 2008

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FICTION/Krasikov, Sana
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Subjects
Published
New York : Spiegel & Grau 2008.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
229 p. ; 22 cm
ISBN
9780385524391
0385524390
Main Author
Sana Krasikov, 1979- (-)
  • Companion
  • Maia in Yonkers
  • The alternate
  • Asal
  • Better half
  • Debt
  • The repatriates
  • There will be no fourth Rome.
Review by Booklist Reviews

Many of Krasikov's characters in her captivating debut are immigrants of the former Soviet Union, searching for, and often finding, resilience in life and love. In the heartrending "Maia in Yonkers," Maia, a Georgian immigrant, scrupulously plans her son's visit to New York, where she works as a caretaker. When the two embark on a tour of the city, the tension between Maia's expectations for her son and his juvenile indifference swells to an anxious climax. "The Alternate" follows Victor as he comes to term with the life he left behind during a dinner with the brash American daughter of his former Russian lover. In "Debt," Lev, a loving uncle who built a new life in America, struggles with a request from his wayward niece, Sonya, who only appears in her uncle's life when she is in need. Krasikov's careful prose augments the quiet complexity of her characters as they confront love and loss within an unfamiliar landscape. Despite their melancholic situations, the protagonists in these eight tales still manage to find moments of reckoning and grace. Copyright 2008 Booklist Reviews.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

An O. Henry Award winner who published her first story in The New Yorker, Ukraine-born Krasikov offers a debut collection. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Library Journal Reviews

The fiction of post-Soviet immigrants has been gaining in popularity over the past few years but has mainly focused on the experience of Russians. In her first story collection, Krasikov, a native of the Ukraine, adds two other dimensions to this recent phenomenon: the experience of women in particular and of the peoples of the smaller Soviet republics (Georgia, Tajikistan, etc.) after the fall of the Soviet Union. Krasikov has noted the influence of the book of Ruth on her stories, which maintain a biblical surface calm while telling the stories of women caught in tough situations, having sacrificed security and prosperity for love or devotion (especially to children). The tone, however, remains fairly constant throughout, and many of the motifs are revisited once too often without enough contrast, which makes it hard to see the collection as more than a series of repeated technical studies, perhaps in preparation for Krasikov's anticipated first novel. The collection as a whole shows promise, however, and librarians should watch Krasikov's name in the future. A suitable addition to public libraries.—Sam Popowich, Univ. of Ottawa Lib., Ont. [Page 58]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

In her stunning short story debut, Krasikov hones in on the subtleties of hope and despair that writhe in the hearts of her protagonists, largely Russian and Georgian immigrants who have settled on the East Coast. In "Better Half," 22-year-old Anya gets a protection order against her husband, Ryan, after he attacks her; he pleads for forgiveness, but, Anya realizes, "a future with Ryan would be like staying in Russia." In "The Repatriates" a man returns to Moscow—to his wife's disappointment—intent on applying to the Russian stock market some tricks he picked up on Wall Street. In "Maia in Yonkers," a Georgian immigrant is visited by her son, and the tensions are fierce and palpable. In "The Alternate," Victor meets the Americanized daughter of an old love from Russia. Though many of Krasikov's stories are bleak, there are swells of promise; even Lera, whose husband leaves her for another woman, "suddenly felt nothing but the most pure-hearted compassion for him, a kindness and forgiveness that almost broke her heart." Krasikov's prose is precise, and her stories are intelligent, complex and passionate. (Aug.) [Page 38]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

A debut collection of short fiction by a recipient of the O. Henry Award is populated by characters--mostly displaced women--who, despite the odds and challenges in their lives, continue to hold out hope that the love in their lives will make everything all right. 30,000 first printing.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

A collection of short fiction is populated by characters--mostly displaced women--who, despite the odds and challenges in their lives, continue to hold out hope that the love in their lives will make everything all right.

Review by Publisher Summary 3

One More Year is Sana Krasikov's debut collection, illuminating the lives of immigrants from across the terrain of a collapsed Soviet empire - people in search of love and the good life - forging new paths and sometimes retreading old ones. A man abandons Wall Street after eleven years to seek his fortune in his native Moscow, leaving his wife to make sense of this sudden reversal of their lives. A divorcee who boards with an older man finds herself an outsider among her more prosperous immigrant friends. A young wife from Central Asia struggles to break out of a polygamous marriage to a husband she still loves. A widow from Tbilisi, supporting her son from abroad, finds the boy a stranger when he visits her in Yonkers.With novelistic scope, Krasikov captures the fates of people making their way in a world whose rules have changed. Full of emotional insight and compassion, these stories tap into universal aspirations that resonate beyond each character's connection with country or place.

Review by Publisher Summary 4

One More Year is Sana Krasikov’s extraordinary debut collection, illuminating the lives of immigrants from across the terrain of a collapsed Soviet Empire. With novelistic scope, Krasikov captures the fates of people–in search of love and prosperity–making their way in a world whose rules have changed.