Sun bread

Elisa Kleven

Book - 2001

As the rain pours from the sky and wind whips around, everyone in town is blue without the sun in the sky, so the baker makes some special bread that cheers up the animals and that sets off a series of events that quickly leads to the sun's reappearance.

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Location Call Number   Status
Children's Room jE/Kleven Due Feb 19, 2022
Subjects
Genres
Picture books
Published
New York, New York : Dutton Children's Books 2001.
Edition
1st ed
Language
English
Physical Description
unpaged : ill
ISBN
0525466746
Main Author
Elisa Kleven (-)
Review by Booklist Reviews

Ages 2-6. It's overcast outside, and housebound animals miss the sun. Then the baker, a dog in a frilly apron, decides "to make my own small sun inside," creating rich, golden, sun-shaped bread. But this is no ordinary bread: it rises to unbelievable proportions, with an aroma and taste so delicious the animals begin to rise and shine themselves--figuratively and literally. Even the real sun can't resist. It breaks through clouds, bringing color, rainbows, and a perfect sunny day for all to enjoy. Bouncy rhymes make this inventive tale an irresistible read-aloud, and Kleven's art is a great match. Enchanting, busy, colorful illustrations combine playful perspectives with whimsical details, patterns, and textures to show an expressive animal cast in familiar and magical situations, from gloom to bright sunshine. A simple recipe for "sun bread" (which, "alas won't make you fly") is printed on the back of the jacket. An exuberant charmer that creatively celebrates the joys and inspiration of sunshine and freshly baked bread. ((Reviewed May 1, 2001)) Copyright 2001 Booklist Reviews

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

Sun, fun and dough are on the rise in this tasty picture book about a baker who helps brighten up her snowbound town. Joy and color have all but disappeared in the midst of a dreary, relentless winter: "The wind it whooshed, the snow it whirled/ / Bare trees shook like chilly bones./ Children grumbled in their homes." But the proprietor of Fiesta Bakery believes she has just the recipe to set things right. With her "loving touch," she fashions a sun-shaped loaf of bread that magically rises and shines, filling the townspeople's stomachs and spirits. The animal citizens' celebration stirs the real sun from its sleep, creating a ripple effect that spreads sunshine and happiness throughout the land. Kleven (Abuela) handles what could have been a sappy theme with a light touch. Her buoyant rhyming text brims with shimmering imagery ("It glittered on the blue-green seas,/ Wove golden ribbons through the trees") and has a consistent, fun-to-read-aloud rhythm. A menagerie of anthropomorphic animals cavorts and nibbles on sun bread in cheerful compositions of paint and collage. A good time (and good food) is had by all, and a recipe for sun bread on the book's jacket invites readers to join the fun. Ages 2-6. (May) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Review by Publishers Weekly Reviews

According to PW, "Sun, fun, and dough are on the rise in this tasty picture book about a baker who helps brighten up her snowbound town." Ages 2-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Review by School Library Journal Reviews

PreS-K-A wintry village inhabited by a variety of unlikely creatures is the setting for this rhyming tale about how the efforts of a humble baker restore the sun to a chilled world. Bellicose bears, argumentative monkeys, a lachrymose pig, and a depressed giraffe are among the distressed animals pictured. It's not until the town's baker, an innovative little dog, bakes a smiling bread in the shape of the sun that the residents have reason to rejoice and hope. As they share in the feast, their bodies as well as their spirits are so lightened that they rise into the sky. There they make such a joyful noise that the long-slumbering sun is awakened. The baker somehow intuits that it wants some of his special loaf and the happy villagers share it with the celestial body. Sunlight is restored to the Earth and returns the next day for the little baker's promised sun bread and buns. A recipe is included. This sunny tale is marred by an uneven rhyme scheme and awkward phrasing. The story also suffers from a certain incongruity and lack of logic as well. Why are tropical animals depicted in such an alien environment? Why does the sun want to eat sun bread? Kleven's characteristically charming folk-art-inspired collages far outshine the text in this instance.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Review by Publisher Summary 1

As the rain pours from the sky and wind whips around, everyone in town is blue without the sun in the sky, so the baker makes some special bread that cheers up the animals and that sets off a series of events that quickly leads to the sun's reappearance.

Review by Publisher Summary 2

During a horrible, snowy storm, a baker bakes sun bread, which cheers up the whole town and even coaxes the real sun to come out.